SED Final Years: Dissertation Hall of Fame – Win £25 Love2Shop Voucher with your Selfie or MEME #SEDHallofFame

To celebrate 🎉 our final year students handing in their final projects/dissertations we’re looking for your dissertation selfies 🤳 and memes 🤣.

You could win a £25 Love2Shop voucher for sharing your dissertation selfie or meme.

Give us the a pic with the story of your disso or make a gag-worthy MEME to win!

How to enter…

  1. Email us your picture or MEME, full name and caption to: sed-web@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Tag us @QMULSED on Instagram or Twitter with the hashtag #SEDHallofFame
  3. Message or post to our Facebook Page here

Entry closes on 15 June 2020 at 11am BST. Our team will pick the winners on or shortly after 15 June 2020 so please get your entry in before then! There will be 2 winners one for selfie and one for meme. We will contact winners via email so keep an eye out on your inbox after 15 June.


Fahima Begum – BA English

Samiha Begum – BA English

Chloe Hocking – BA English

“I have had the most amazing time at QM over the last three years. I’ve met some soulmates. Had a few breakdowns. Hit my limit of daily replacement library cards. Spent £49000 on coffee. And had most of the happiest moments of my life. I know that this dissertation doesn’t sum up everything I’ve learnt and everything that I can do now (notably, go to the shop without having a panic attack). But it was definitely one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. And I’m proud of myself for doing it. A huge thank you to every lecturer, advisor, member of staff, and student for helping me through. From helping me choose a dissertation topic to making me a coffee with a smile. Also- to everyone who is still working on their dissertations- you can do this and you will do this. Remember not to compare your own academic achievements to other people’s because yours are just as brilliant and just as important. Okay I’m done now. Gonna go drink, eat, and watch Netflix… Until I have to start the next one.”

Hana Hussein – BA English with Creative Writing

“1 word down 9,999 to go”

Christian Richardson – BA English with Creative Writing

Demi Whitnell – BA English

Student of the month: Yue Wang – PhD in English

I am a PhD student and poet.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

It’s fantastic! I love the people, the natural beauty and the adademic events in QMUL. I am so excited to learn from many excellent scholars, which makes me feel so good.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

I am so grateful to my supervisor Matthew Ingleby who invited me to study here and brought to meet many excellent scholars in 19th century studies seminar held by IES.

I am so lucky to listen to Mark Currie’s lectures in person, whose book I have read before in China. I am so grateful to Professor Scott McCracken and Professor Julia Boffey, whose classes inspire me a lot.

Thanks also to Howard and Hari in the research teamwho helped me a lot during my study. Because of the excellect scholars in English department, my mind was open and my academic net was enlarged. Hopefully I can contribute my academic studies in future and I am willing to be a good bridge between UK and China.

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole?

I think the academic atmosphere attracts me deeply and the independent thinking spirit and the friendly classmates all make me feel so encouraging and enjoyable.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

Usually, I take part in some lectures held by Senate House or KCL. And also I join some poetry recital events or watch a drama performance or visit a cultural site. I hope I can travel all the literary sites related my study project in the next 6 months.

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

Hopefully, there will be more PhD communities, which can encourage exchange and build more social relationships.

Find out more about our English PhD

Announcing: ‘Diaspora Speaks’ – new student publication – Interview with co-founder Sawdah Bhaimiya

We caught up with English student Sawdah Bhaimiya to talk about the new publication Diaspora Speaks which aims to showcase the journeys, opinions and experiences of students of colour.

Tell us about Diaspora Speaks. How did the idea come about and who are the key team?

The main purpose of Diaspora Speaks Magazine is to highlight the journeys, opinions and experiences of students of colour. The idea started forming in my head around November last year, and at the time I was very involved with student media as I was working with Cub Magazine, The Print News, Quest Radio, as well as QMTV. I started to become more aware of the lack of diversity in journalism as a whole and I wanted to fill that gap by creating something that ethnic minority students at the university could get involved with whether they have experience with writing or not. As 69% of Queen Mary students are BAME it seemed right to create a platform where they can be heard. 

I voiced my opinions to a fellow CUB writer, Sara Omar who loved the idea from the start. We watched it grow from an idea to a real outlet and we’re excited to see how far it will go in the next year. The team is currently just Sara and myself, but we are looking to expand and we have open applications to become a part of our 2020/2021 team. 

What or who are your inspirations for working in journalism and starting the publication?

My inspirations for working in journalism are probably Stacey Dooley, Iman Amrani, Liv Little and Anila Dhami. I think real journalism is about being open-minded, exploring different perspectives, and telling the stories that matter. I’ve always been quite an inquisitive and curious person and I enjoy telling stories so I found myself gravitating towards journalism because I feel as if I can have a real impact with it.

Furthermore, a publication that I really admire is gal-dem as they carved a space for ethnic minority women and non-binary people of colour, and really established themselves as serious contenders in a journalistic landscape that can often be hostile to POC.

Diaspora Speaks Magazine is modelled after gal-dem, and we really do hope that ethnic minority students get to tell the stories that matter to them.  

How can students get involved with the magazine? What kind of submissions are you looking for?

We have currently opened applications to become a part of our regular team for 2020/2021. The link to the application is https://diasporaspeaksqmul.typeform.com/to/YQQkDL.

We are looking for regular writers, artists, photographers, section editors, graphic designers, and a treasurer. Submissions can include articles, interviews, poetry, artwork, photography, etc. We have various different sections that can be found on our social media and we will be opening submissions soon so to keep updated follow our social media:

Are there any areas you’ve studied on the English course that have influenced your work on Diaspora Speaks?

I studied Postcolonial and Global Literature as a module this year and it has really enlightened me to the extent of the discrimination faced by POC. I was very unaware of the impact of colonialism before I studied it in English this year, but I am now aware that even though colonialism has ended, its impact is still felt today.

I understand and support the efforts of students and teachers who are working towards decolonising the curriculum, the university and more. Diaspora Speaks Magazine I hope will play a part in that effort. 

Join Alumna Christina Storey’s Instagram Book Club – Interview

We caught up with 2018 English graduate Christina Storey to talk about her brand new book club bringing a new book community to Instagram.

We asked her about the The Storey Book Club, her favourite books and her time at Queen Mary.

Tell us about your new Instagram book club. What should people expect when they join?

For ages I’ve been jealous of my mum’s ‘real life’ book club, and with everything going on at the moment I’ve seen lots of literary events move online so I thought, why not create an online book club?

I’ve been posting my own book reviews on my personal instagram for a while and got a few messages from friends and random followers saying that they liked my book recommendations and wanted more. I decided I wanted to create a little community on the internet that people can just discuss their favourite books and most recent reads.

I’m going to be posting recommendations a lot and plan to have a weekly post of a favourite book from childhood. The main point of it is, of course, the ‘club’ element of it! A book is picked every two weeks, it’s announced on the Saturday evening, and two weeks later there will be a post on the feed with some questions which (I hope!) will create some discussion in the comments! The first book is Everything I know about love by Dolly Alderton and we’ll be discussing it Sunday 26th April at 8pm.

It’s an incredibly new venture for me but I’ve had some great responses so far so I’m excited to grow it further! 

What are your 3 favourite books and why? (too hard? Maybe 3 recent books)

Yes that is a very hard question! I definitely can’t pick favourites but I’ll pick three that I love.

1)       Everything I know about love by Dolly Alderton

  • The reason I picked this as my first book club pick is just because I simply love it. Dolly writes so candidly about her experiences with everything – boys, alcohol, family, friends, loss – and it genuinely had me laughing one minute, crying the next. When I finished it all I wanted to do was text all my friends saying how much I love them!

2)       The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

  • This was the book that I always mentioned in my first year on university when I was asked what my favourite book was! It has such a unique tone of voice and narrator’s perspective, it tells such an interesting story and is very moving.

3)       A Sky Painted Gold by Laura Wood

  • I love young adult books so much (I even wrote my dissertation on them) and this is one of my favourites. Set in the 1920s it has the glamour and wistfulness of The Great Gatsby, is beautifully written and also has great character developments and relationships.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What were the books that made an impression on you?

My time at QMUL was great, I split my time doing my English degree, being in the cheerleading club and working at drapers so I definitely had the full university experience. I am quite set in my ways when it comes to what to read and university definitely pushed me out of my boundaries and opened up so much great literature for me that it’s hard to pick specific books.  Some of the modules I loved were the Arthurian module, Dickens and Jane Austen modules. My favourite module was definitely Reading Childhood/ Writing Children as we analysed so many books from my childhood in a literary sense and I I found it really interesting and thought-provoking!

What advice would you give to current students at Queen Mary about life after university?

Well, my first piece of advice would be to travel! I travelled solo to Australia the January following my graduation. I travelled and worked there for a year and just had the best year of my life. I met so many people, experienced so much and although now some of my friends are ‘ahead’ in their careers compared to me, I don’t regret it at all as I had lots of great life experiences!

However, I realise in the current state of things travel may not be an option and the job market (or lack of) seems even scarier – and I get that, trust me I do! I started looking for a job in publishing when I returned from Australia, and then Corona happened and companies stopped hiring. It’s hard, it’s really hard but you have to try and make the most of it. I’ve been doing some online courses – FutureLearn and Google Digital Garage, which are both really good, and I’ve started up my book club! I’m trying to improve my employability skills so that when companies do start hiring again, I can show them what I’ve been doing with my time and try to be the best candidate possible!

I won’t lie to you, life after University is tough but it’s exciting as well. There is so much out there. Whether that’s career, travelling or your personal life – just try to look for the positives in everything and work as hard as you can!

Announcing ‘Wonderer’ – The Queen Mary Literary Journal – Submit your work by 7 June

We caught up with English students Chloe Lim and Ioana Radulescu to talk about their new literary journal Wonderer, which launches very soon.

Here’s what they could tell us:

“This project is a great opportunity for budding writers, editors and students who just want to get involved to experience working together to improve writing skills, enhancing knowledge of publishing and sharing new, innovative ideas with a group of like-minded, passionate individuals.

About Wonderer and how to get published in the journal

  • Wonderer will accept submissions from undergraduate students enrolled in any institution of higher education
  • Topics of general literary interest, literary theory, dramatic theory, comparative literature, interpretative readings of texts, philosophical approaches to literary works, research into the literary context of (a) particular work(s), intersections between art history and literature, aesthetics, provided that they are based on at least one literary or non-literary work of any genre. Academic papers should be between 3,000 – 8,000 words in length, and comply with guidelines detailed in the MHRA style guide.
  • Submissions are sent to wonderer.journal@qmul.ac.uk
  • The deadline for submissions is 7 June 2020.

The website is: https://www.wondererjournal.co.uk

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wonderer.journal/

Our Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/wondererjournal/

Student of the month: Abdur-Raheem Modan – BA English Literature and Linguistics (Hons)

I am an avid bibliophile and writer.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

My first year has been very exciting and exhilarating. I’ve greatly enjoyed my course and learning material(s). I’ve also had a wonderful time exploring the myriad opportunities/events student life has to offer.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

I intend to continue my course to completion. It’s helped me to further explore areas that have long interested me as well as potential careers/roles.

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole?

I have enjoyed many of the extracurricular activities and events.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

I am a writer and have self-published before. I continue to write, as well as working within my local community as a Young Advisor.

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

Perhaps more contact with tutors.

Find out more about BA English Literature and Linguistics

Coronavirus and the School of English and Drama – FAQs for Students

Last updated: Tuesday 5 May 2020 – 17:00

Headlines

  1. New Extenuating Circumstances (EC) rules: Please see below for our SED response to the new EC rules announced by the Vice-Principal, including information about Semester 2 EC requirements and the new ‘Fit to Sit’ rule.
  2. Assessment changes: Please see below for our SED response to Assessment changes announced by the Principal.
  3. Grace Period: You can submit your work up to 14 days late without the need for a Late Work application. The 14-day “grace period” applies to all assignments due in Semester 2 (i.e. those with deadlines from 16 February), the Exam Period and MA dissertations (due in August). The “grace period” also now applies to the “Take-Home Examinations” for ESH101 and ESH110.
  4. Teaching, supervision and drop-in hours: All face-to-face teaching and student support in the School of English and Drama has taken place online and/or by phone since Friday 13 March and continues like this until further notice for the 2019-20 academic year.
  5. Access to Buildings: The Library and Arts One (including Drama’s performance spaces) have been temporarily closed. PC labs have been closed for health and safety reasons. Please consult Queen Mary’s central information for updates.
  6. Access to University services: Services are available online, including The LibraryAdvice and Counselling, and the Dyslexia and Disability Service.

Frequently Asked Questions

WELLBEING

Queen Mary remains committed to supporting students at this difficult time. Please see:

There is also information on what to do if you’re worried about coronavirus on Queen Mary’s dedicated web-pages and on the UK’s NHS website.

ASSESSMENT CHANGES DUE TO CORONAVIRUS

  1. What are the general principles behind our alternative arrangements?
  2. How will I be assessed?
  3. How will my year-average mark be calculated?
  4. Assessment rules

Please note all quoted text is from Queen Mary’s assessment changes in response to coronavirus.

Late Work Reports

Please login to QMplus before clicking these buttons

Fit to Sit & Extenuating Circumstances Forms

“We understand that the current coronavirus situation can be a source of uncertainty and anxiety for students due to sit assessments. However, we want to reassure you that no student will be disadvantaged as a result of this situation: all final year students will receive an award and all continuing students will be permitted to progress (see below for details).

We’ve put together the following advice to help give you certainty during this time. Please carefully read the advice that relates to your degree type and situation.

If you have a query that’s not covered by the below guidance, please contact your Advisor, Supervisor, Student Support Officer, the Student Enquiry Centre, or the Academic Advice Centre at QMSU.”

What are the general principles behind our alternative arrangements?

“Our alternative arrangements were approved after careful consideration, looking at academic quality and standards to maintain the integrity of your awards, your experience as a student, the need for institutional consistency, and external expectations from the higher education sector. At the heart of our considerations was the central ‘no detriment’ principle: that no student should be delayed in their graduation or in progressing to the next level of study as a consequence of circumstances that have been beyond anyone’s control. The arrangements were approved on the delegated authority of the Senate, our highest-level academic committee.”

How will I be assessed?

“A mark must be generated for each module that you are taking. In some cases, the Module Organiser will have determined that you have already completed sufficient assessments for us to generate a module mark without any further assessments (discounting any elements yet to be completed). In other cases, the Module Organiser has reached the decision that we cannot fairly base a mark on the assessments that students have completed so far. In this case, an additional assessment will be required. This may be submission of a further item of coursework, but in many cases, this will be submission of an ‘alternative assessment’ online (see below). Your school/institute will be able to advise which is the case for each module.”

Please read Queen Mary’s assessment changes in response to coronavirus.

Yes. We expect all students to complete their written assignments. You should submit this work to QMplus as normal.

Specific arrangements for alternative assessments (see below) have been made for any presentations (where necessary), exams and practice-based assignments. Please check the relevant QMplus assessment area for details or contact your module convenor.

Update: Please see Queen Mary’s assessment changes in response to coronavirus.

The School of English and Drama is committed to ensuring that no student is disadvantaged in their assessment outcomes as a consequence of the current pandemic and the transition to online teaching. Members of staff in the School have been instructed to mark your work on the basis of the teaching you have received and the resources that you’ve been able to access, and asked to adjust their expectations as necessary.

In advance of the Subject Examination Boards in English and Drama that confirm your final marks for the year, the School will take extra measures as described in Queen Mary’s assessment changes in response to coronavirus to review student achievement and progression in order to ensure that all students are being treated equally and sympathetically.

The introduction of the 14-day “grace period” generally means that your grades and feedback will be returned 14 days later than expected return date published on QMplus. This is because staff aren’t able to start assessing your work until the “grace period” has passed. This delay is to avoid any risk of marking the wrong version of your assignment if you replace it (without penalty) during the 14-day “grace period”.

How will my year-average mark be calculated?

“Each module you take has a credit value. At the end of the year an average mark is generated, using the credit values to weight the mark. For 2019/20, in accordance with the Queen Mary approach to ensuring ‘no detriment’, the 30 credits with the lowest marks (or 15 credits, for Postgraduate Certificate awards – which are 60 credit awards – only) will not count towards the calculation of the average mark for the 2019/20 year. Your adjusted year average will then be used in turn to generate the mark used for your classification at the end of your studies. (Please note that if your lowest marks are the result of an assessment offence penalty those marks will not be excluded, and the next lowest 30 credits will be excluded instead.)”

Please download this PDF on ‘Estimating your Degree Classification and calculating previous Year and Semester 1 2019-20 averages’

Assessment rules

I need to submit my work after the existing deadline. Do I need to submit a Late Work application?

Only if your assignment is more than 14 days (or 336 hours) late. In light of the coronavirus pandemic (as well as the effects of the recent industrial action), the School of English and Drama will not apply Late Work Penalties to any assignment submitted within two weeks (14 days, or 336 hours) of the deadline. You therefore do not need to submit a Late Work Report application for any written assignment submitted less than two weeks late.

This 14-day “grace-period” applies to all assignments due in Semester 2 and during the Semester 2  Exam Period. In other words, all assignments with deadlines that fall between 16 February 2020 and 31 May 2020 and MA dissertations (due in August), can be submitted up to two weeks late, without penalty. The “grace period” also now applies to the “Take-Home Examination” for ESH101 and ESH110.

I didn’t know about this change in policy and I’ve already submitted my assignment. Can I update it without penalty?

Only in particular circumstances: You can replace your assignment on QMplus up to 14 days (or 336 hours) after the deadline without needing to submit a Late Work Report application. Please take care, though: any replacement submission you make more than 14 days after the deadline will mean that the assignment is considered late (even if you had originally made an on-time submission).

What do I do if I need to submit my work more than 14 days (or 336 hours) late?

If you submit an assignment more than 14 days after the deadline, you should follow the School’s existing processes relating to late work.  The latest date by which you can submit a late assignment that is due in Semester 2 or in the Exam Period is 1 June 2020 at 12:00 noon.

1 June at 12.00 noon is also the deadline to submit any Late Work Report applications for assignments due in Semester 2 or in the Exam Period.

I have outstanding assignments from Semester 1 for which I had ECs accepted in January 2020. Do I also get a “grace period”?

Yes. The deadline for you to submit your outstanding assignment is now 1 June 2020 at 12:00 noon.

I’m a student resitting out of attendance, or have a resit assignment from last year. Do I also get a “grace period”?

Yes. The final deadline for you to submit your resit assignment is now 1 June 2020 at 12:00 noon.

What do I do if I miss submitting an assignment or the ‘take-home exam’ altogether due to extenuating circumstances?

Any assignments due in Semester 2 (before mid-March) and the Exam period that you are not able to submit by the 1 June deadline will be treated has having extenuating circumstances and will be awarded a first sit without penalty at the next opportunity, which is in August 2020. You do not need to submit an Extenuating Circumstances application to request this.

If you did not submit a Semester 2 assignment due before mid-March, you will need to submit an Extenuating Circumstances application to be awarded a first sit without penalty. The application process with be released shortly. It will be ‘light touch’ and the regular evidence requirements will be lifted due to the coronavirus pandemic. The important point is that you submit the application.

The submission deadline for any outstanding assignments is 12 August 2020 at 12:00 noon, and we will send you detailed submission instructions after the July Exam Board. We strongly recommend that you continue to work on your assignments and DO NOT wait until you receive your results in July. This will ensure that the work is ready for submission in good time.

If you did not submit an assignment that was due in Semester 1, you also have until 12 August 2020 at 12:00 noon to submit any outstanding assignments, however, your module mark might be capped/uncapped depending on whether you submitted an End of Semester EC in January 2020 or not.

New ‘Fit to sit’ rule

Normally the core principle behind the extenuating circumstances policy is the 'fit to sit' rule. By taking an assessment (submitting an assignment or taking an exam), students declare themselves fit to take it; any claim for extenuating circumstances relating to that assessment is not considered, and the assessment is marked.

To recognize the difficulties students are facing during the current circumstances, the ‘fit to sit’ rules have been partially lifted and students can now submit extenuating circumstances even if you have attempted the assessment provided you do so before marks/feedback for the given assignment is released.

This new rule is in effect from Tuesday 28 April. Therefore, only claims that are submitted for assignments where grades were released on or after 28 April will be considered. Claims can only be submitted BEFORE grades are released and you will need to submit a claim for each assignment affected.

The deadline to submit a ‘Fit to sit’ claim to request an uncapped first sit of a previously submitted assignment is 1 June 2020 at 12:00 noon.

The School of English and Drama provides the following guidance, which we hope you will find helpful in calculating your averages and degree classification. The School cannot confirm your calculations, which are estimates. Results are confirmed at the Examination Boards in July.

Please download this PDF on ‘Estimating your Degree Classification and calculating previous Year and Semester 1 2019-20 averages’

Advice from the University:

"Your final mark for classification will be derived using all your marks from your previous years of study, as well as the best 90 credits from your final year of study (which is year three for bachelor’s degrees, and year four for undergraduate master's programmes).

In some cases, students will already have passed 90 credits (e.g., if a student has sat and passed modules adding up to 60 credits from Semester A and has a pass grade for a 30 credit research project module). In that case, your school or institute will advise you of your provisional grades and recommended award based on the 90 credits already passed. You would not then be obliged to complete the alternative assessments for the remaining 30 credits in Semester B modules. However, we strongly recommend that you take any remaining assessments available to you to give you the best chance that your 90 credits used to calculate your year average and overall degree mark are scored as highly as possible.

To be eligible for a foundation certificate or a graduate diploma, you must have completed modules to the value of 120 credits and passed at least 90 credits (including a minimum of 30 credits at the academic level appropriate to the award).

To be eligible for a bachelors degree, you need to have studied 360 credits, and to have passed a minimum of 270 credits in total with at least 30 credits passed at level 6. (These requirements may be higher for your award to be accredited by the relevant external, professional body). For an intercalated bachelors award, you must have completed 120 credits and passed a minimum 90 credits including at least 30 credits at level 6.

Remember: while it's mathematically possible for a student who passed 240 credits across years one and two to pass just 30 credits in their final year in order to receive a bachelors award, the low marks for the other, uncompleted, final year modules would have a severe negative impact on classification. This is why we encourage you to complete alternative assessments where you can, to give yourself the greatest number of opportunities for success.

To be eligible for an undergraduate masters degree, you need to have studied at least 480 credits, and to have passed a minimum 360 credits in total with at least 30 credits passed at level 7*."

"If you're studying a PGT award, the standard regulations for award will apply, except that:

a) failed modules can be condoned from zero rather than 40.0 (where condoned failure is permitted), and

b) the mark on which your award is classified will be calculated excluding the weakest 30 credits-worth of marks (or for PgCert, 15 credits).

For part-time PGT students not due to graduate in 2020 but impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, the principles described will be applied in your year of graduation. The external requirements of any relevant Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) may mean that certain programmes are obliged to follow the original rules to qualify for accreditation."

There are no core modules in the School of English and Drama.

You are strongly encouraged to continue working on your assignments, make use of the 14-day ‘grace period’ and submit all your assignments. It is important to remember that any work that you complete is still useful to your learning. We will give feedback on any assignments that you submit to help you prepare for your next developmental year, further studies or professional life.

Information from the University:

"All non-final year students (including students on an integrated with-foundation degree programme) will be permitted to progress, no matter the number of credits that you pass.

However, you'll be contacted by your school or institute to advise you if you have passed insufficient credits to receive an award, and you will be advised to resit assessments in the 'late summer' period.

If you weren't on track to progress – for example, if you'd already failed more than 30 credits in the Semester A exams – staff in your school/institute will discuss your options with you individually. But if you nevertheless wish to continue, you will be entitled to do so.

As continuing students, when you complete your degree programme (ie, no earlier than the summer of 2021), your final marks will be calculated both including and excluding all marks from the academic year 2019-20. Consistent with the 'no detriment' principle, you'll receive the higher of those two marks: the final mark that includes 2019/20 and the final mark that excludes any contribution from this year.

For example:

    • For a bachelors student currently in year one, this means calculating your final mark based on a weighting of your year averages for Years 1, 2 and 3 in the ratios 1:3:6 and of 0:3:6, and taking the better of the two outcomes
    • For a bachelors student currently in year two, this would mean calculating your final mark based on a weighted average (for Years 1, 2 and 3 respectively) of 1:3:6 and of 1:0:6, and taking the better of the two outcomes
    • For students on undergraduate masters degrees, we would use the best outcome from 1:3:6:6 and 0:3:6:6 or 1:0:6:6 or 1:3:0:6, depending on which developmental year corresponds to the academic year 2019/20.

In accordance with Queen Mary's approach to a 'no detriment' principle, the marks for the weakest credits from the year will be excluded in all cases; where the recalculated year average would still bring the final mark down, the whole year will be excluded from classification. Note that this only applies to undergraduate programmes, not part-time/multi-year postgraduate taught programmes."

Your Year Abroad does not count in the calculation of your degree classification (it’s a pass/fail element of your programme, which you only need to ‘pass’ in order to progress to your final year). All students in the School of English and Drama who are studying abroad for the 2019-20 academic year will receive a pass grade for the Year Abroad.

Details of all alternative assessments should now have been released; please contact your module convenor if you do not have these details.

Will I still need to complete assessed presentations for my modules this semester?

You will be asked to complete any assessed individual presentations via telephone or video conferencing (e.g. Skype, FaceTime), or written alternative where this has been agreed with your teacher. Your teacher will be in touch to arrange this in due course.

In the case of any assessed group presentations, you will be set an individual alternative assignment directly relating to your presentation (e.g. written script or notes, powerpoint slides, podcast, video). Again, your teacher will be in touch with further details. You will need to make your submission online to QMplus (in the same way as a written assignment) and a dedicated submission point will be set up. The deadlines for these alternative assessments will be no less than two weeks after the date on which a group presentation was due to take place.

Will I still need to complete assessed practice-based assignments for my Drama modules?

Specific arrangements for alternative assessments will be made for each practice-based Drama module this semester, where practical projects had been scheduled between 16 March—9 April and in the Exam Period (May 2020).

Will I still need to take my examination in May for ESH101 Shakespeare and/or ESH110 Literatures in Time?

Queen Mary has cancelled in-person examinations this May/June, including for ESH101 Shakespeare and ESH110 Literatures in Time. However, you will still be expected to complete an alternative assessment for these modules.

I'm supposed to be collaborating with other students on a group assignment: what should I do?

All students collaborating on group assignments will asked to make an individual submission for that piece of assessment to QMplus. Where circumstances permit, you may continue to collaborate with others in your group, in person or remotely, depending on your personal circumstances. Where you are unable to continue collaborating, please inform the rest of your group and continue working independently on the assignment instead. Where a member of your group is no longer able to collaborate, please respect their decision and continue to work with the remaining members of your group. All members of a group may make identical written submissions to a group assignment when you are drawing on collective work. Please ask your teacher for further advice if you are uncertain.

My module has a participation grade. How will I be assessed?

Your mark for participation (where this applies to a module you are taking) will be generated on the basis of the teaching you have received. Your teachers will grade your participation sympathetically, especially in cases where you may have had absences or online access difficulties.

My dissertation is due in hardcopy and e-copy. Do I still need to submit a hardcopy?

No. Undergraduate and MA dissertations are now only due electronically via QMPlus by the original deadline (date and time).

How should I submit an assignment that was due in hardcopy only?

All assignments will now be submitted electronically via QMplus.  Your teacher will advise on any revisions to the assignment brief (e.g. submitting photographs of objects you have made rather than submitting the object itself).

Detailed information can be found on individual module areas on QMplus.

"The Undergraduate Degree Examination Boards, which confirm awards, will be held on 24 July, and the Postgraduate Boards (for students who were expecting to complete in July) on 4 August. Students will be formally notified of outcomes a few days later."

The School will contact students with information about Late Summer Resit assignments as soon after the June Subject Examination Period as possible.

Please continue to work on your assignments you are unable to submit by the final deadline of 1 June, as assignments in the Late Summer Resit Period will be the same. If alternative assessment is needed (e.g. for a presentation) you will be sent the updated rubric as soon as possible.

The deadline to submit assignments in the Late Summer Resit period is expected to be 12 noon 12 August 2020 (TBC).

Advice from the University:

"Examination boards will occur slightly later than usual, so notifications of the need to resit assessment will also be later. There will be more information on this soon, but we expect the reassessment period to be in late August. Academic schools and institutes are likely to use alternative assessment for those assessments, too, as we do not yet know whether we will be able to open to hold invigilated exams."

All students with resits from last year have been informed of the assignments they still need to submit and the revised submission deadline of 12 noon 1 June 2020.

There are designated Resit tutors within School. Please do contact them for help with your assignments.

For English assignments please contact Howard Finn - h.j.finn@qmul.ac.uk

For Drama assignments please contact Sarah Harper - s.j.e.harper@qmul.ac.uk


RESPONSE TO THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGLISH AND DRAMA

All academic Schools at Queen Mary are cancelling face-to-face teaching on their programmes from 5pm on Thursday 19 March.

In place of face-to-face provision, teaching and learning activities are being migrated online, principally via QMplus. In the School of English and Drama we took the decision to stop face-to-face teaching and migrate online from Friday 13 March.

This is in order to address multiple concerns about student and staff wellbeing, and to ensure a parity of experience for all students, including those who have been forced to absent themselves from class and/or return home due to the current pandemic.

Our joint honours partner Schools have made similar decisions, replacing face-to-face teaching with online teaching: the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film has cancelled all face-to-face teaching from Monday 16 March and the School of History has cancelled all face-to-face teaching from Tuesday 17 March.

Our decision is supported by the Principal of Queen Mary, Professor Colin Bailey.

Face-to-face teaching and related meetings/supervisions in the School of English and Drama have been cancelled from Friday of Week 8 (13 March) until further notice for the 2019-20 academic year.

No student will be required to come onto the Mile End campus for face-to-face teaching in the School of English and Drama for examinations or other assessments in May.

No, although the School of English and Drama has closed physically the School’s administrative team remain available to support you remotely during normal working hours (Monday-Friday, 9am-1pm and 2-5pm); please contact sed-information@qmul.ac.uk. Your teachers and advisors are available remotely for you for online teaching, supervision and support.

No. We have been advised that the ArtsOne building has been temporarily closed to all but essential staff.

ONLINE TEACHING & STUDENT SUPPORT

Academic staff have been asked to make the best possible arrangements for their modules in terms of providing online content, and to be available remotely for students in their classes during the normal timetabled teaching slots. These arrangements will necessarily vary, and you will need to watch out for specific announcements from your teachers about your lectures, seminars, and practice-based classes. In general we anticipate that online teaching materials will be available for you via QMplus for each class.

Please attend online classes at the scheduled UK time. If this isn’t possible (e.g. you’re asleep), please review the work and tasks for the assigned week at a convenient time, as close to the original class as possible.

Yes, as far as possible lecture content will be made available to you. Often this will mean reviewing a lecture from last year’s module via QReview, although sometimes teaching staff may post new video or audio content, or upload scripts. Copies of lecture slides and handouts will be uploaded to QMplus as normal.

Your teachers will advise you about what will happen in particular online sessions. You might, for example, be asked to email questions, contribute to online forum discussions, work through preparation questions, complete research tasks, etc. Copies of classroom slides and handouts will be uploaded to QMplus as normal.

You should prepare for class in the usual way as far as possible by following existing (or updated) information on QMplus and/or in module packs. Look out for specific instructions from teaching staff, and take a look at this list of suggestions for how to prepare for online teaching and learning.

Download our advice document

In the first instance please contact your seminar/workshop leader or module convenor. They will be best placed to advise you what arrangements are in place for online learning on your module. Please be patient with your teachers as they adjust to this new way of working. You shouldn’t necessarily expect to find any additional online materials for the class until the date/time at which it is due to start.

The requirements for online learning in the School of English and Drama will be the same as your normal access to QMplus. However, if you do have concerns about your capacity to participate due to technical limitations, please get in touch for advice at sed-information@qmul.ac.uk. If you do not have access to a computer due to financial hardship can apply for support through the Financial Assistance Fund. Please also advise your teachers of your concerns.

Queen Mary’s Library at Mile End and the University of London’s Senate House Library have been temporarily physically closed; please review their websites for up to date opening information. Both libraries offer online resources (e.g. journals, ebooks, databases) and you are strongly encouraged to make use of these resources, along with those on QMplus and other online sources, as appropriate (e.g. museums, galleries, artists, theatres etc.). Please be in touch with your teacher if you have concerns about access to resources.

Please only travel in accordance with UK government guidelines; if you’re outside the UK, please consult local guidelines.

You are not required to attend performances, exhibitions or undertake independent fieldwork in the UK set for your modules. Your teachers will advise of alternative learning activities and any assessment-related adjustments, where appropriate.

Please only travel in accordance with UK government guidelines; if you’re outside the UK, please consult local guidelines.

Please only travel in accordance with UK government guidelines; if you’re outside the UK, please consult local guidelines.

Please refer (as appropriate) to QMUL's "Advice about travel" FAQs and the guidance for PhD students from the Doctoral College. Students concerned about disruption to plans relating to international (or domestic) travel relating to their research are also encouraged to consult their supervisor(s), module convenor, MA Course Convenor and/or Director of Graduate Studies (in the case of PhD students), as appropriate.

Yes. All teaching staff are expected to retain their existing drop-in hours and to offer remote meetings via email, telephone, and/or video conferencing, advising of you of any changes to availability where necessary. Staff are expected to use the same mechanisms to offer dissertation supervision as normal. Please feel free to contact your advisor, teacher and/or dissertation supervisor to find out what arrangements they have made and to book a remote appointment.

Online renewal: You can renew your books online. Please consult The Library’s self-service webpage for details. If you experience any problems renewing, please contact library@qmul.ac.uk

Loan periods: The Library is working to extend loan periods for items already on loan. Please check the Library website for updates.

Fines: All fines have been waived as of Monday 16 March, and no further fines will be incurred during the closure period.

Holds (reservations): These have ceased as of Wednesday 18 March.  See the Library website for information on access to resources (books) and further information on alternative ways to access resources during the closure period.

Please consult the Library website for more details of digital support and services.

No. PC labs have been closed for health and safety reasons. Please consult Queen Mary's central information for updates.

Yes. Please consult the FAQs on the Doctoral College webpage and contact your supervisor and/or Director of Graduate Studies by email for further details.

We expect the process to follow the timetable set out in the module directory.

DRAMA SPACE & SUPPORT

Yes. You’re welcome to contact members of the team by email.

FEES

The University has provided guidance on this matter. Please consult the centrally maintained FAQs for further information.

HOUSING

GRADUATION

No. Queen Mary has postponed summer graduation ceremonies, and will be communicating new dates as soon possible. Please consult Queen Mary’s graduation information and general FAQs for updates as they become available.

TRAVEL

Please only travel in accordance with UK government guidelines; if you’re outside the UK, please consult local guidelines.

Please refer (as appropriate) to QMUL's "Advice about travel" FAQs and the guidance for PhD students from the Doctoral College. Students concerned about disruption to plans relating to international (or domestic) travel relating to their research are also encouraged to consult their supervisor(s), module convenor, MA Course Convenor and/or Director of Graduate Studies (in the case of PhD students), as appropriate.


This guidance has been compiled in order to provide students in the School of English and Drama with the best possible information available at the time of writing. Please remember that the institutional, national, and international contexts in light of the coronavirus pandemic are uncertain and changing, and it is likely that this will continue for some time. As a consequence, we will need to update this information from time to time. Any new decisions that are taken will always be with the best interests of students and staff firmly in view.

If you have a question for the School of English and Drama that is not addressed by this page, please email us on sed-information@qmul.ac.uk.

Eleni Sophia (English Student) on getting to the Final of Gradventure with her business Perspective Press Global

“So I got a phone call from Francesca telling me I had been nominated for the sem-finals for Gradventure – a competition for the student entrepreneurs of the University of London group where we would be pitching for funding! There were 16 semi-finalists and 8 of us made it to the finals!

On 1 February I had to pitch at Goldsmiths and a week later I was told I had gotten through to the finals! I believe I am the youngest finalist- the others have already graduated.

Next week, (March 12) I will be pitching for funding! By this time next year I want six authors published under Perspective Press Global so I need this funding to be able to provide services for editing, illustrating, marketing, cover designing etc.

When I graduate, I want to work on this full time; there is nobody else doing this in the UK and I already have a large following of almost 60,000 followers on my Instagram- many of whom message me asking me for help! I just need the funding to take it further; everything else is already in place!

Also, just as a side note, in celebration for International Women’s Day we will be donating a pack of sanitary towels (per book sale) for women who cannot afford them in order to raise awareness of Period Poverty!”

PASS (Peer-Assisted Study Support) in the School of English and Drama

Finding deadlines and time-management overwhelming? Requiring academic support and guidance from undergraduate students? PASS is here to help!

PASS (Peer-Assisted Study Support) is a mentoring scheme which is run by students for students, specifically first-year students who have a keen interest in gaining academic advice from upper-year undergraduate students. PASS is firmly established in 14 departments at Queen Mary, including the English and Drama department. Mentors at PASS offer invaluable and comprehensive help to students, which has proven to benefit students moving onto their final years at university. 

For English PASS, most of the sessions which run on a weekly basis are orientated around upcoming assignments and assisting students with queries related to academia. I think this scheme is a great opportunity for first-year students to consolidate their learning by discussing their queries or interests. 

For more information about PASS feel free to email the links below: 

Samrawit Elias (English PASS student organiser)

s.elias@hss17.qmul.ac.uk

Lydia (PASS Drama Student Organiser)

l.m.d.hallam@hss17.qmul.ac.uk  

Student of the month: Kerry Hunt – BA Drama (Hons)

Always willing to participate

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

Study Abroad programme, QMTC, working for the SU and student ambassadoring

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

Grown my confidence, met new people, taken part in programmes which I otherwise wouldn’t have

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole? (societies/friends/community/values)

Meeting the most amazing international friendship group

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

Producer at Stage 3 Theatre Company, working for the SU and a bar in Aldgate, currently looking for full-time employment

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

Livelihoods could have included some speakers who didn’t just tell us that we would be unemployed and working for free in the future!

QMUL app | SED Social Media | 3 things to do to boss 2020

We’re so excited to welcome students, staff and friends to the School of English and Drama (SED).

Here’s a quick reminder of some easy ways how to connect with us online and a bonus 3 things to do this weekend:

QMUL APP

QMUL APP

The QMUL app is a good way to access all QMUL systems in one place including timetables, campus maps, email, QMPlus and key information.

Also if you’re looking for a way to read email use the OUTLOOK app (Apple/Android) and your username@qmul.ac.uk to login.

SOCIAL MEDIA

insta

3 THINGS TO START 2020 WITH A BANG!

Constellations
  1. Winter Lights 2020: You have one week left to see a mesmerising free festival of outdoor light art in Canary Wharf – 10 minute bus from QMUL.
  2. See an Oscar nominee for £5 in our People’s Palace Great HallDavid Strathairn (Good Night and Good Luck; Lincoln) presents a unique performance for Holocaust Memorial Day.
  3. See a free epic CLIMATE CHANGE art exhibition at Mile End Arts Pavilion: The exhibition will showcase the work of emerging artists and designers alongside protest artefacts, exploring the immediate challenges of the climate crisis and beyond, to the new way of living. Throughout the exhibition there will be a range of associated events, talks and workshops from organisations such as Women’s Environmental Network, Client Earth and Extinction Rebellion as well as from featured artists.

Student of the month: Nicole Brownfield – BA (Hons) English (Alumna)

I am an ambitious, positive and proactive individual constantly on the move, seeking out my next challenge.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

Becoming Editor in Chief of CUB Magazine, meeting new people that I would never have encountered had it not been for university and broadening my mind by studying modules that have changed my outlook on life completely such as all of the postcolonial based modules. Also completing my dissertation and seeing how my initial idea blossomed and having it published as an official document to be circulated in academic circles.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

It has given me a first class degree which will make me stand out to employers. I am actively looking to pursue a job in journalism or editorial industries.

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole? (societies/friends/community/values)

The diverse and inclusive community at QM which welcomes everyone and also caters/puts on events for everyone. Also being affiliated with and working closely with QMSU as Editor in Chief of CUB.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

I had an internship writing for the UK branch of an American magazine called SOCIETY19 last summer writing mainly for the sex and relationships section. I have just started a two month placement as an Editorial Administrator for an educational company called SAM Labs. My goal is to find a permanent job doing the editorial work I love.

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

To really advertise the social side of the university and also the support side, especially for mental health.

Student of the month: Rebecca Barton – BA (Hons) Drama

Meet our Student of the Month! Rebecca tells us about her time at SED so far

Irish lady moves to London and now, does not sound so Irish anymore.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

By far, my time at QM has been made incredible by the people. I know that I have met people here who will be my friends for the rest of my life. And that’s something you always hear will happen at university and hope it’s true! I’m very glad it became true for me. And it’s not just the people themselves, it’s the way they inspire me as well. The art that is being made here, particularly in the sense of theatre, is something I have never been exposed to before.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

My course has helped me in a lot of ways. Before coming here, I definitely saw myself as a strict theatre maker but I know now that’s not the case! Performance art is a whole new kind of theatre in itself that I have been exposed to through the Drama degree at Queen Mary and a kind of theatre that I find so compelling and thought provoking!

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole? (societies/friends/community/values)

Definitely the Queen Mary Theatre Company. QMTC has been the highlight of my whole first year. I’ve been involved in it since the first festival in September and basically haven’t slowed down since then! The theatre being made in QMTC and the standard of student written work being produced there is just astounding. And the welcomeness and friendships I have made inside of QMTC are going to stick with me for life.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

Well, I’ve been involved in a bit of theatre outside QM. I performed in ACT 2, which is the new title for the London Student Drama Festival. That was incredible, because I got to do some great work with theatre people outside of QM. Expand my horizons, shall we say. I also worked with a fantastic company called SHITE Productions, which was making a play in a day. And I am working as FOH staff for Jeff Wayne’s The War of the Worlds The Immersive Theatre Experience, also getting to be a standby for some of the acting roles. That opportunity has been an incredible one for me. There are so many opportunities for experiences in theatre outside QM – you just have go look!

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

I think less of a segregation between arts and sciences.

English and Drama Newsletter – October 2019

Welcome to October. We have some incredible events and news to share with you so please read on…

Picture: Meet our student of the month Şenay Camgöz from MA Live Art

Read Şenay’s post

Events

OCTOBER OPEN DAY

Undergraduate Open Day
Saturday 5 October 2019, 10am-3.30pm

From Werewolves to live art, taster sessions at our open day are a great chance to explore English and Drama at QMUL.

Book online

FEATURED

A Season of Bangla Drama
November 2019, Various venues in Tower Hamlets including QMUL

A Season of Bangla Drama is back in Tower Hamlets for another month-long festival of British-Bengali theatre. It is now in its 17th year and firmly established in the area’s cultural calendar and includes a magnificent performance of East Side Story in our very own Great Hall in The People’s Palace.

Download the Season brochure

LISTINGS

New Suns: A Feminist Literary Festival
Saturday 5 October 2019, Barbican

Nisha Ramayya is reading and speaking at New Suns which explores new and continuing debates in feminist approaches to technology. She will also be reading and speaking at: Exploring Poetry as Disruption (Sat 19 Oct – Southbank Centre)  States of the Body Produced by Love (Fri 25 Oct – ICA)

Solitude, Sociability and Insanity in the Nineteenth Century
Tuesday 8 October 2019, ArtsTwo 3.20, QMUL

In the first paper in our 2019/20 seminar series, Mark Lee from the University of Oxford explores devotional solitude through the lens of ‘religious insanity’ in the nineteenth century.

Philosophy as Therapy
Wednesday 9 October 2019, LSE

Our very own Molly Macdonald is on the panel for to discuss whether thinking philosophically can be a form of self-help.

Writing Our Way Home
Tuesday 15 October 2019, Free Word EC1

What role can literature play in combatting hostile environments? In a new and exciting collaboration between Wasafiri and London’s Free Word Centre, Roger Robinson, Winsome Pinnock, Inua Ellams and Bridget Minamore join forces for readings and debate on writing and resistance. 

Find out more

QUORUM Drama Research Seminar: Molly McPhee
Wednesday 16 October 2019, QMUL

Be sure to go to the next QUORUM entitled ‘Miasmatic Performance: Carceral Atmospherics in the Theatre of Clean Break’. Photo: Pests by Vivienne Franzmann. Photo by Jonathan Keenan.

English Postgraduate Research Seminar
17 and 31 October, QMUL

Join us for the next English Postgraduate research events from Patrick Flanery and Kirsty Rolfe.

Follow @QMEnglishPGRS on Twitter for booking links

Doing Dr Duckie’s Homemade Mutant Hope Machines
Tuesday 22 October 2019, Attenborough Centre, University of Sussex

Drama PhD Ben Walters unpacks the world-making approaches to performance, cabaret, culture and care for so-called ‘marginalised’ communities.

Book here

Children Behind Bars

Thursday 24 October 2019, 2.07, Bancroft Building, QMUL

Matthew Ingleby will be giving a paper entitled ‘The Child through the Railings’ at this event.

Matthew will also be hosting a free Children’s Bloomsbury Walking Tour as part of Bloomsbury Festival on 20 October.

The Occult
Wednesday 30 October 2019, LSE, WC2A

How does philosophy contend with the mysterious and the inexplicable? Can it really be logic all the way down, or might rationality stand on something a little spookier? Our very own Nisha Ramayya is on hand to discuss at the Forum for Philosophy.

WEAVE IT! – Exhibition
30 October – 6 November 2019, Stour Space

Decorating Dissidence, run by our very own Jade French and alumni Dr. Lottie Whalen, invite you to ‘WEAVE IT!’ an exhibition celebrating and challenging 100 years of the Bauhaus women’s weaving workshop.   This exhibition considers the legacies of crafting and weaving from modernism to the contemporary, exhibiting textile practitioners who respond in different ways to the Bauhaus and beyond.

The launch night on 1st November will see performances by Rasia Kabir and SED’s Julie Rose Bower, with DJs and drinks. 
ONGOING


Read the Room – Contemporary Poetry Reading Group
Every Wednesday (12-1pm) in the Yurt, St Benet’s Chaplaincy, QMUL

Join Read the Room every Wednesday (beginning 9 October) to gather together and fill the room with poetry. Each week we will read aloud work by a different poet or on a different theme, appreciating the culture of contemporary poetry and a collaborative environment.

Meet other poetry enthusiasts or casual readers, stay on top of poetry events, or just enjoy reading something new. Drop in or just come when you can, Read the Room aims to be an accessible space to have fun with poetry.

Sign up for updates

BOOK AHEAD

Frauke Requardt & Daniel Oliver
Dadderrs

5-6 November 2019, The Place

Daniel is dyspraxic and is too slow.
Frauke has ADHD and is too quick.
They are married and have kids.

Join the couple in the Meadowdrome, their fantastical escapist world. Together you will encounter awkwardly intimate interactive actions, strange dances, sweet and surreal songs, and other off-kilter “grown-up” activities.

This interactive show invites you to explore, converse and play within the neurodivergent realm Daniel and Frauke have created.

Find out more

Turning the Page
Saturday 30 November 2019, QMUL

Launching an anthology of writings, Turning the Page, by the SBS Survivors’ Group: A literary conversation between two groups of BAME women – published writers responding creatively to the stories of the SBS support group.

Email us your event

News

Mojisola Adebayo will be presenting The Interrogation of Sandra Bland at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in October, culminating in a performance by a huge chorus of black / women-of-colour on stage.

Pragya Dhital joined the English department in September as a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, with a project on proscribed political pamphlets in colonial India. During the summer she had two articles published: “From ‘Imam ul-Hind’ to Azizul Hind: The ‘One Man Media House’ in Modern India”, South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, 42:3, 452-468, DOI: 10.1080/00856401.2019.1596778 “Media satyagraha in the broadcast age: underground literature and populist politics during the Indian internal emergency of 1975–1977”, Interventions: Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 21: 7, 942-958, DOI: 10.1080/1369801X.2019.1585908

Michael Hughes (Creative Writing Lecturer)’s book is reviewed by The New York Times: ‘Hughes’s story proceeds at a breakneck cinematic pace, full of booby traps, double agents and arias promising gruesome revenge.’ Read the full review here

Eleni Sophia (aka English student Sophia Hussain) has published her third book ‘This One’s For You’. The poetry collection is about encouraging young women about the importance of self-love and provides words of encouragement for those going through a tough time.

In July, both Khloe and Kourtney Kardashian shared her poem ‘Her Mindset’ from my first poetry book, ‘Good Morning to Goodnight’ on their Snapchat and Instagram stories.

Hari Marini (Research Student Support) has published her poetry collection 28 ΔΙΑΔΡΟΜΕΣ ΤΗΣ | 28 PATHS OF HER. It has been reviewed here.

Susheila Nasta (English Professor) is has edited a collection called Brave New Words: The Power of Writing Now (Out 7 November) an anthology of essays by 15 world writers to celebrate 35 years of Wasafiri but also channels the hot political topics of today. It features work from Bernardine Evaristo, Tabish Khair, Blake Morrison, Mukoma wa Ngugi, Marina Warner and many more.

Pathologies of Solitude project has been awarded a ‘Diversity and Inclusion’ grant by the Wellcome Trust (£21,192) for a project addressing solitude and loneliness as aspects of migrant and refugee experience.

The 18-month project is led by Akshi Singh, postdoctoral fellow on the ‘Pathologies of Solitude’ project, and Nisha Ramayya ( Creative Writing Lecturer at QMUL), and is partnered by Akwaaba, an anti-racist migrant befriending centre in East London.

The project will support six creative arts workshops to be held at
Akwaaba, facilitated by BME writers and other diverse artists. Its
results will be disseminated through zines made with workshop
participants, an exhibition and a public story-telling event.

People Palace Projects’Xingu Encounter has been nominated for a Times Higher Education award for ‘International Collaboration of the Year’. The project explores new ways to work with indigenous people in Brazil to preserve & protect their knowledge & culture.

Mahima Tyagi (English with Creative Writing student) has taken over the School of English and Drama Instagram.

Follow us for news and views from Mahima and our students

Ellen Wiles (English Teaching Fellow) curated and spoke at Asylum Stories: Fact, Fiction, Truth event at British Library.

Follow us on Instagram

Whilst we try our hardest to make sure listings are accurate we recommend contacting the event organiser or registering before attending as mistakes can be made and we apologise for these.

Student of the month: Şenay Camgöz – MA Live Art

Şenay Camgöz (MA Live Art) tells us about her work and highlights at QMUL…

www.senaycamgoz.co.uk

I am an artist and filmmaker developing my creative practice.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

The highlight was a screening of my short film, ‘Introducing HALA’ at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late event in April 2019.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

I am half way through my MA in Live Art and have already had the chance to share my work with a wider public. The practical support I have received at Queen Mary University has helped me to promote my work on social media networks. Through QMUL I had the chance to screen my work at a major national museum which has given me the confidence to seek opportunities to share my work more widely.

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole? (societies/friends/community/values)

Practical workshops have been very useful, in particular, the DIY Life Skills workshop on using Photoshop.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

The essay writing I have been doing as part of my MA has inspired me to write more and I am currently taking part in a collaborative writing project with other arts and humanities students.

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

More practical workshops on how to approach institutions with a view to sharing work and advice on writing applications for residencies.