Postgraduate Open Events 2018

We are delighted to meet prospective students at the following events:

English

Artist Callout: 10 Minute Ideas for ‘Theatre in the Dark’ Scratch Night

Deadline – Monday 8 January 2018

Summary
To mark the 20th anniversary of Battersea Arts Centre’s seminal Playing in the Dark season in 1998 and the launch of a new book Theatre in the Dark by Martin Welton and Adam Alston, BAC and Queen Mary University of London are presenting a Theatre in the Dark week in February 2018.

As part of this week of events there will be an ‘in the dark’ curated Scratch Night on Friday 9th February at 7.30pm.

We are currently looking for submissions of ideas for that Scratch Night. There will be 4 artists or companies selected to perform.

Scratch
Scratch is about testing new ideas in front of an audience in order to get feedback, to see what works and what doesn’t. It is about taking risks in a supportive and positive atmosphere and learning through doing.

So we are looking for new ideas that need to be tested rather than pre-exiting work or polished pieces.

The Parameters
• The pieces should be no more than 10 minutes
• The Scratch Night will take place in the Council Chamber – more information on the space and the set up below.
• The Scratches should require limited tech.
• We will provide a blacked out space, a PA and a basic lighting rig.
• The artists chosen will have half an hour to have a technical rehearsal during the afternoon before the Scratch Night.
• It is an ‘in the dark’ Scratch Night so ideas should explore darkness or gloom although it doesn’t have to be dark from beginning to end.
• Selected artists/companies will be expected to think through the health and safety implications of their idea.

The Space
The Council Chamber is a room which is about 16 metres long and 10 metres wide with a high ceiling.

The space will be set up in a simple, 3-sided thrust formation with seats on the flat – no rake. There will be a decent-sized stage area – exact dimensions TBC.

Money
There will be a fee of £500 for each artist/company asked to do a Scratch.

Application process
• Fill in an application form by visiting https://goo.gl/forms/xlhGGitrK3ABHON73
• You can submit your ideas in writing and/or video
• Deadline: 10am Monday 8th January
• Applicants will be informed no later than Wednesday 11th January.

Photo Special: The Great Yiddish Parade – Part of Being Human Festival

Our very own Dr Nadia Valman was a key organiser of the ‘The Great Yiddish Parade’, which took place on 19 November 2017.

The event was a re-enactment of an 1889 protest march by Jewish immigrants in Victorian Whitechapel. That year, strikes were erupting all over the East End, and demonstrators demanded better conditions and wages for all East End workers. 

The Great Yiddish Parade of 1889 used the medium of music, song and oratory to build solidarity and attract others to their cause. Their protest songs, in Yiddish — the language of Jewish immigrants — were recreated by a band of klezmer musicians and singers. At Mile End Waste, a strip of green space in Whitechapel where political rallies were held in the nineteenth century, speakers addressed the audience of participants and locals with oratory taken from East End political activists. In the photos below see east London’s forgotten heritage of protest being brought to life in poetry and song.

Thanks to the Being Human festival of the Humanties and QMUL Centre for Public Engagement. Photographs by Ralph Hodgson.

 

Nadia Valman and Julie Begum in Aldgate

Singer Brendan McGeever with the Great Yiddish Parade song sheet

Vivi Lachs and Julie Begum in Whitechapel

Lucie Glasheen gives song sheets to passersby

The parade passes Aldgate East station

The parade at Middlesex Street

Watching the parade in Whitechapel High Street

Passersby read the song sheet

A shopkeeper watches as the parade passes

Musical director Sarha Moore and musicians

The parade in Whitechapel

Watching the parade in Whitechapel Road

The parade approaches Mile End Waste

Oratory by the statue of William Booth, Mile End Waste

Carrie Hamilton as anarchist orator Emma Goldman

Julie Begum as investigative journalist Olive Christian Malvery

Rabbi Janet Burden of Ealing Liberal Synagogue

Organisers Nadia Valman and Vivi Lachs at Mile End Waste

SED at Being Human Festival

Being Human Festival 2017 #BeingHuman17 is festival celebrating the humanities.

This year the theme is ‘Lost and Found’ and our School of English and Drama are involved with exciting events and coverage in the following ways:

#BeingHuman17

Shahidha Bari

BBC Radio 3: Free Thinking at Being Human

Tuesday 21 November, 10pm

Shahidha Bari will co-host a special studio discussion looking at how the themes of loss and rediscovery play out in discipline across the humanities, featuring research from

Matthew Ingleby

Bloomsbury and the grounds for philanthropy

November 25, 6:30 pm8:00 pm
Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square
London, WC1N 1AZ United Kingdom
+ Google Map

In this event, Dr Matthew Ingleby will lead a panel discussion exploring the role urban geography has played historically in revising the bounds of human sympathy. Bloomsbury has been associated with philanthropic innovation since 1739, when Thomas Coram established the Foundling Hospital in fields on what was then the northern edge of London. The Foundling was followed by a plethora of pioneering charitable organisations, such as Great Ormond Street Hospital for children (founded 1852), the first of its kind in the UK. Both of these institutions popularised new ways of thinking about the recipients of their care, and each became fashionable within London society partly through their endorsement by cultural celebrities, including the composer Handel and the novelist Dickens.

This event is supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP).

Nadia Valman

Left luggage: reading Sam Selvon in Waterloo Station

Last immigrants arriving off the SS Empire Windrush at Waterloo Station, London.
November 18, 2:30 pm4:00 pm
Waterloo Station, Waterloo national rail station, Waterloo Road
London, London SE1 8SW United Kingdom
+ Google Map

The dramatic backdrop of Waterloo Station, point of arrival in London for Caribbean migrants in the 1950s, provides the setting for this guided walk. Experience the vibrant writing of Trinidadian-born novelist Sam Selvon, who evokes the expectations and apprehensions of new arrivals at Waterloo, as well as feelings of loss and nostalgia. Our stroll around the station and its environs will take in Selvon’s lyrical and witty reflections on London Transport, on railway travel and waiting in stations, on the pleasure of chance meetings and the alienation of encountering a city of strangers. In partnership with the Migration Museum Project.

Assemble at the Left Luggage office, Waterloo rail station. The office is located close to the Waterloo Bridge exit from the concourse.

The great Yiddish parade

November 19, 11:00 am12:30 pm

Free

‘The great Yiddish parade’ is a re-enactment of a protest march by Jewish immigrants in Victorian Whitechapel, demanding better conditions for all East End workers. Experience the urgency, fervour and intensity of political culture in the Victorian East End. Join a band of klezmer musicians and singers performing newly discovered Victorian Yiddish protest songs in their original setting. Participation is warmly encouraged, and song sheets will be provided (no knowledge of Yiddish is required). March from Aldgate to Mile End Waste (about 1 mile), where you will find out more about east London’s forgotten heritage of protest in poetry and song.

 

Book online via the event title links above for all events.

Masters Open Evenings Announced for November 2017

We are delighted to announce that booking is now open for our autumn Masters open events:

Drama Masters Reception

Tuesday 28 November 2017 – 5.30pm – QMUL, Mile End

Covering for 2018 entry:

MA Theatre and Performance

MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health

MA Live Art (subject to validation)

Book online


English Masters Reception

Wednesday 29 November 2017 – 5.30pm – QMUL, Mile End

MA English Literature:

Book online

People’s Palace Projects – October Events

Efêmera play – Southwark Playhouse

In Brazil and the UK violence against women and girls is on the rise; recent research suggests that the majority of Brazilian migrant women have experienced gender-based violence. Efêmera introduces us to two women with a story to tell. They may have the courage to share it with you, they may not. A powerful and delicate piece about how to hold on when life falls apart.

Based on interviews conducted by researchers from the Department of Geography at King’s College London (and previously at Queen Mary University of London), this is a verbatim piece with a twist. It will be performed in London as part of the 10th anniversary of CASA Festival at the Southwark Playhouse and in Rio de Janeiro.

The research is directed by Professor Cathy McIlwaine and co-directed by Professor Paul Heritage in partnership with People’s Palace Projects and the Latin American Women’s Rights Service (LAWRS) and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) under the Newton Fund. You can read further about the research here.

Efêmera will be presented as a scratch performance as part of CASA Festival 2017.

Tickets can be bought at Southwark Playhouse website.

Cast & creative team: Gaël Le Cornec, Angie Peña Arenas and Rosie MacPherson

Efemera (as part of Casa Festival 2017)
9.30pm on Thursday and Friday 5th and 6th October 20175pm on Saturday 7th October 2017.

Southwark Playhouse, 77-85 Newington Causeway, London SE1 6BD

Note: There will be a discussion panel hosted by Cathy Mcllwaine after the 5pm showing on the 7th.

 


No Feedback free public performances

No Feedback is a theatrical event highlighting the gentle pull of discrimination that tears at the fabric of everyday life. Offering an insight into human nature, it is set against the backdrop of catastrophes both historic and contemporary. By taking Genocide Watch’s ground-breaking research as the backbone of the production, No Feedback intelligently and sensitively asks audiences to consider their own place on the spectrum of how we relate to one another.

Come and play your part in this new kind of theatre experience at two public performances happening in October. Booking is essential.

This project is produced in partnership between People’s Palace Projects and No Feedback Theatre Company.

17th October , 7.30pm –  Mulberry and Bigland Green Centre

15 Richard Street

Commercial Road

London

E1 2JP

 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/no-feedback-performance-at-mulberry-and-bigland-green-centre-tickets-37121864496

 

24th October, 7pm – Studio 3 Arts Boundary Road

Barking

London

IG11 7JR

 

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/no-feedback-performance-at-studio-3-arts-tickets-38140374888?aff=erelpanelorg

 


Discussion Exploring Cultural Value in the Creative Economy

 

Peoples Palace Projects will be hosting a research discussion exploring cultural value and the creative economy as part of the AHRC-funded Relative Values project. It will be an opportunity to meet Prof. Leandro Valiati, one of Brazil’s leading cultural economists, who takes up a post as Visiting Professor in the Economy of Culture at QMUL from beginning of December.

 

Monday, October 30th, 10.00, at Queen Mary University Mile End Campus, Bancroft Building, room 3.40. 

Please reserve your place here. 

 

The conversation will focus on Relative Values, an AHRC-funded research project led by Prof. Paul Heritage in partnership with Prof. Valiati. Bringing together academic and non-academic partners, the research asks how we can measure and strengthen practices and policies that maximise the social and economic value of the arts to individuals and society, particularly in peripheral urban environments. The project aims to contribute to understandings about cultural value and to enable the four participating UK and Brazilian arts organisations to collaborate on testing effective ways to show how the arts can be incubators for creative economy initiatives that develop resilient, low-stress communities.

 

About Professor Valiati

Leandro Valiati has been responsible for setting up research Observatories of the Creative Economy across five different regions in Brazil, developing a series of indicators on a range of economic development and social welfare criteria. His experience includes teaching, consultancy and research in Economy of Culture in national and international institutions, including Brazil’s Ministry of Culture, UNESCO, Brazil’s Economics and Statistics Foundation, the Organisation of Ibero-American States (OEI)  and the University of Valencia in Spain. Leandro is the leading researcher of the Creative and Cultural Economy Study Centre at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul and member of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq).  He is collaborating with Paul Heritage at People’s Palace Projects on two current research projects.

 

From 1 December 2017, Leandro will take up an Honorary Visiting Professorship at Queen Mary University of London for 2 years, in addition to honorary posts at the Sorbonne and other European institutions.

 

#SEDweekly – Events and Opportunities Digest – Wednesday 15 March 2017

Here’s our latest events and opportunities we’ve sourced that are coming up in the next week from tomorrow Thursday 16-Wednesday 22 March.

Please do get in touch if you have any listings for our next edition.

Events

THIS WEEK

English PGR Seminar: Dr Adam Kelly, University of York | Thu 16 Mar | 18:15 in Room GC203 | QMUL Mile End

We’re delighted to invite you to the next English Postgraduate Research Seminar, with Dr Adam Kelly from the University of York, who will be presenting a seminar entitled ‘The Novel at the End of History: Donald Trump and Infinite Jest’.

 

Inaugural Lecture: Warren Boutcher: Beyond English: Going back into (literary) Europe | Thu 16 Mar | 18:30 – 21:30 | QMUL Mile End

Join Warren Boutcher, Professor of Renaissance Studies and Head of School of English and Drama, for his Inaugural Lecture.

Register online here

 

Queen Mary Centre for the History of the Emotions presents: Emotions, Identity and the Supernatural: The Concealed Revealed Project | Tue 21 March | The Horse Hospital, Covent Garden | Free

Owen Davies (University of Hertfordshire) and Ceri Houlbrook (University of Hertfordshire) will talk about their work on the Concealed Revealed project.

 

Widening the Net: Collaborating between Digital and Performance | Tue 21 Mar | 16:00-18:00 | QMUL – Mile End

Both MAT and the QMUL School of Drama have a disciplinary investment in digital technologies as a means for producing performance, and as a theoretical mode of engagement. From digital archival practices to motion-capture, quantitative approaches to stage blocking, to cyborg and automated performance, MAT and SED scholars use radically different theoretical frameworks and material practices, but are driven by
a shared investigation of how people perform and behave, and how digital technology influences this.

How can our knowledges support and inform each other? Such cross-over and conversation is common and essential to the growth and development of humanities and technology research.

As a way to fill in the gaps in our departmentalknowledge of each other, and our methodologies, ideologies and practical resources, PhD candidates Amy Borsuk of SED and Vanessa Pope of MAT are widening the net as part of Intersections, a series of MAT interdisciplinary events.

We invite staff and postgraduates from SED and MAT to meet and share their research on Tuesday, 21 March from 4–6 pm in Rehearsal Room One in ArtsOne Building.

For this pilot event, we invite guests to give a 1 minute presentation on your research as formally or informally
as you like, highlighting what you are researching and what you would like to know about the other department, other practices, or other disciplines.

Register to attend

 

For more SED events see our calendar here

 

Jobs & Paid Internships

No listings this week.

Opportunities & Volunteering

Flare Festival Call Out for Performances | Deadline 17 March

The Flare International Festival of New Theatre, taking place in Manchester 4-8 July this summer alongside the Manchester International Festival, is still looking for challenging and original new theatre pieces by existing and recent students for its Future Flares strand (the main call for artists is also still open). Full details at http://www.flarefestival.com/future-flares/

 

Calls for Papers

 

Queer Localities: a two-day international queer history conference at Birkbeck, University of London | 30 November – 1 December 2017 | Deadline for Proposals: Mon 20 Mar

Download the CfP

Popular Performance : Localisation, commercialism and globalisation at V&A | Deadline: Thu 13 Apr

Download the CfP

 

To add a listing to next week’s digest please email us by Monday 20 March 2017 at 5pm

We try and keep these listings as accurate as possible but errors can occur. Please check with the relevant party before going to an event or taking up an opportunity.

See new works in development by artists Seth Kriebel and Hari Marini on Wednesday 15 March 2017

Staff and students are invited to participate in two short performances of new works in development by artists Seth Kriebel and Hari Marini.

4pm-6pm Wednesday 15 March at 16:00 in FADS (Film and Drama Studio), Arts Two Building, QMUL

SED staff and students with interests in adaptation, literature in performance, performance process and development, dramaturgy, and audience studies, are invited to attend and offer feedback on two new projects in development by artists Seth Kriebel and Hari Marini.

If you are interested in the creative process, or the adaptation of texts by contemporary theatre makers, this is a timely opportunity to see two short pieces and hear from professional artists about the development process – where ideas have emerged from and how they have been developed. If you are currently in the middle of developing your own performance projects, it is an opportunity to get some insight into the working methods of two professional artists currently undertaking their own processes of research and development – both of whom are interested in gaining feedback about the work, and how they might develop it further.

These performance presentations are also contributing to a wider research project within the Department of Drama concerning audience engagement and response, and to cross-disciplinary work carried out by colleagues working on Human and Computer Interaction in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. As part of this, some audience members will be asked to volunteer wear motion-capture devices that will monitor response. These technologies for, and the possibilities and pitfalls of, measuring audience response and engagement will be highlighted as part of the discussion. What knowledge of audience response could do for the development of a performance or for the evaluation of it will be discussed.

As well as Seth and Hari’s own post-show discussion with the audience, Dr Pen Woods and Dr Martin Welton will introduce their audience work and invite students’ response and commentary.

 


 

Seth Kriebel will be experimenting with the interactive performance-game format he pioneered in his shows The Unbuilt Room and A House Repeated in a new work loosely based on Beowulf (Old English epic poem). Seth’s interactive performance games combine the simplicity of bare-bones storytelling with the limitless possibilities of contemporary open-world computer games. Audiences work together to navigate a described space or narrative, overcoming obstacles and exploring this other world without leaving their seats.

 

Seth’s previous works have been described as follows:

“Turns the concept of immersive theatre on its head… Stunning in both its simplicity and its power.  ★★★★★” – Londonist

“A gently fascinating interactive world… it’s funny, too.”  – Time Out

 


 

Hari Marini is a performance maker based in London and one of SED’s teaching and school staff members. Her performance collection PartSuspended creates performances starting from personal experiences, everyday life, social space and architecture. Every space is potentially a performance space. They draw on contemporary life for performance material: questions, pleasure, anger, fractures, contradictions; these are explored with the audience. Their process is open to participants in a variety of forms, they have performed in theatre spaces and galleries but also in tents, on staircases, trains, underground spaces and pavements. Their performances look for fragments, chance, intuition, randomness, facts and poetry; for words that have been unsaid, bodily expressions that have remained disclosed, communication that is yet to be achieved.

www.partsuspended.com

“Work that pushes the audience’s imagination and their senses .. these are subtle and intelligent performers” – Fringe Review

 

 

MA English Studies graduate Richard Dodwell talks about his new theatre work PLANES

MA English Studies graduate Richard Dodwell is presenting his new show PLANES at The Yard Theatre in Hackney Wick from Tuesday 31 January.

 

PLANES | Tue 31 Jan-Sat 4 Feb | The Yard Theatre, Hackney Wick | £15/£12 (conc)

 

Tell us about your new work PLANES? How did it come about?

PLANES is a “live tuning” into missing things. By that I mean it’s a live work for theatre that explores notions of remembering and processing difficult experiences, with a live accompanying score by the poet and composer Timothy Thornton. In this case, that difficulty is the suicides of people close to me. Mental Health is in crisis and more and more people seem to be suffering as services are slashed and the world becomes crueler. I suppose, as someone trying to survive, the work emerged to try and harness the truth of both what grief is and how we move forwards—but it’s a tough one! I did a couple of scratch previews of that work, with the help of Arts Council England and Battersea Arts Centre, and then The Yard invited me to present the work as part of their NOW 17 festival of new performance. So I was really chuffed about that.

 

Who or what inspires you to make theatre work?

Anything and everyone really. I try to make work that’s honest and not too obscured by style and posturing, although inevitably when you “make” something it always runs the risk of being perceived as such. I guess that’s the magic of any kind of art making or creativity—the multitude of ways it can be perceived. I’m not here to moderate or manipulate anyone’s feelings, although I am trying to create a world where people find some sort of connection. I’m hugely inspired by the European avant-garde and the New York experimental theatre of the 70s and 80s. The Wooster Group particularly are a huge inspiration, as is the writer and filmmaker Derek Jarman. I guess I want to make work that documents the experience of being alive, here and now, without too much thought.
 

What was studying English Studies at Queen Mary like? Do you have any favourite memories or tutors?

Fantastic. I have very warm memories there. The English Department is second to none: great teaching, excellent resources and the chance to really engage with literary theory—which has influenced my creative practice hugely. My favourite memory is meeting Matthew, who studied on the MA with me. He was a wonderful friend and support throughout the course, and introduced me to lots of new left-wing and radical revolutionary thought. He was a wonderful person: sensitive, vibrant and hugely caring. Sadly, Matthew took his own life in October last year. I miss him hugely. This show is partly dedicated to him.

 

For more information about Richard’s work please visit his website here

Being Human Festival 2016 Programme Announced

The full programme for Being Human Festival led by University of London’s School of Advanced Study has been announced and is available to peruse to your heart’s content here.

We’ve picked out a few events that caught our eye and feature some of our School of English and Drama connections:

 

 

queen-mary-university-of-london-no-feedbackNo Feedback

People’s Palace Projects is a partner on this one…

Saturday 19 November | 18.00–19.30

No Feedback is a theatrical event highlighting the gentle pull of discrimination that tears at the fabric of everyday life. Giving an insight into human nature, it is set against the backdrop of catastrophes both historic and contemporary. By taking Genocide Watch’s groundbreaking research as the backbone of the production, No Feedback intelligently and sensitively asks audiences to consider their own place on the spectrum of how we relate to one another. Come and play your part in this new kind of theatre experience.

More info and book online here

 

 

queen-mary-university-of-london-spitalfields-winter-1892_a-guided-walkSpitalfields, winter 1892: a guided walk

Led by SED’s Dr Nadia Valman

Sunday 20 November | 16:00–17:45

Novels have a particular power to conjure the past life of a place and to make us alert to the traces of the past that are still visible all around us. See Spitalfields in a new light through the eyes of bestselling Victorian writer Israel Zangwill and his closely observed novel Children of the Ghetto. Explore the neighbourhood with the ‘Zangwill’s Spitalfields’ walking tour app created by Dr Nadia Valman with the Jewish Museum, London and Soda Ltd. This app brings together archive sources including photographs, documents and digitised objects from the Jewish Museum to create an immersive experience of the lively and fraught milieu of Jewish immigrant life in Victorian Spitalfields. Hear about the making of the app and sample its content on the streets of east London in this guided walk.

More info and book online here

 

 

queen-mary-the-museum-of-the-normalThe museum of the normal

Includes SED’s Dr Tiffany Watt Smith is presenting a talk entitled: ‘Blending in: The Lost Art of Disappearing’

Thursday 24 November | 18.00–21.00

From angst-ridden teenage letters to agony aunts to concerned posts in online parenting forums, it’s clear that as a society we are haunted by a fear of being labelled abnormal. But who gets to define what’s normal? Is it really something to aspire to? And is worrying about ‘being normal’ normal? At this drop-in late event at Bart’s Pathology Museum, led by the Queen Mary Centre for the History of the Emotions, visitors will enter the ‘land of the abnormal’: a pop-up museum of games, talks and performances addressing different aspects of the history of normality. Expect lost emotions, historical psychometric tests, themed refreshments, history of medicine talks and guided tours of the ‘museum of the normal’.

More info and book online here

 

 

See the full programme here

or why not read the curator’s highlights here

#NationalPoetryDay – Win a Place in SED History

Today, Thursday 6th October is National Poetry Day and we’re celebrating the literary form with a competition on Twitter that could make your words part of SED history.

Simply tweet us a poem with the hashtag #SEDrhymetime and your poem could be printed, framed and put somewhere special in the School.

More details on Twitter here

 

Here’s 3 more ways you can engage with the day:

  1. Check out Time Out’s guide to #NationalPoetryDay events today.
  2. Visit the Poetry Library in the Southbank Centre.
  3. Search for what’s happening near you on the National Poetry Day website here

 

We teach a variety of Poetry modules within these programmes:

Autumn SED Events & Arts Preview 2016

The changing of the seasons means a whole new batch of SED students and we’re really excited to present a lot of in house events as well as champion the diverse cultural highlights London has for 2016.

Chez nous (French) / At Our Gaff (Cockney)

English Postgraduate Research Seminar

A weekly English research seminar that takes place every Thursday during the first and second semesters of the academic year.

  • 29 September: Prof Catherine Maxwell (Queen Mary), ‘Carnal Flowers, Charnel Flowers: Perfume in the Decadent Literary Imagination’
  • 6 October: Pub Quiz at the SCR bar, Queens’ Building, Mile End campus.
  • 20 October: Dr Ewan James Jones (University of Cambridge), ‘Thermodynamic Rhythm / The Poetics of Waste’
  • 27 October: Prof Nicholas Royle (University of Sussex), title TBC.
  • 3 November: Dr Clara Dawson (University of Manchester), ‘Letitia Landon: Close Reading Print Culture in the 1820s.’
  • 24 November Kathryn Allan, (UCL), title TBC.

Download the programme here

Quorum

Hear about the latest developments in theatre and performance with engaging research seminars plus free drinks and nibbles at the School.

  • 5 October: Bridget Escolme – Nostalgia for empire in Shakespeare costuming – Rehearsal Room 2
  • 19 October: Philip Crispin Translating Un Tempête – Rehearsal Room 2
  • 2 November: Namita Chakrabarty [auto ethnography and Critical Race Theory in Theatre Application on disaster – Pinter Studio
  • 16 November: Aylwyn Walsh [terrorism and incarceration] – Rehearsal Room 2
  • 30 November: Margharita Laera [Giorgio Stehler and the Piccolo Teatro] – Rehearsal Room 2
  • 14 December: Joe Kelleher [Economies of Art]

All details of these events are subject to change please sign up below for the latest.

Also keep an eye out for:

  • Free taster lectures at our next Open Day
  • A Season of Bangla Drama

Everybody is welcome at these events but please do sign up here to get further details and invites to our events:

And the best from London…

We asked folks on Twitter to send in suggestions about events happening near us (featured below) below but it’s not too late to add yours.

Tweet us your #SEDautumnwonders

 

Caoimhe Mader McGuinness

Station House Opera - Photo by Jospeh Buttigieg

Penelope Woods

  • Donmar Warehouse’s Shakepeare Trilogy: An all female Shakespeare season in a new 420-seat in-the-round temporary theatre at King’s Cross.

donmar-warehouse-750x375

 

Markman Ellis

newlondonshoot4

 

Rupert Dannreuther

  • Barbican Open Fest – Saturday 8 October: A free festival at the UK’s largest cultural hub including films, performances and a new designers’ market.
  • VISIONS at The Nunnery – 5 October-18 December: A festival on our doorstep in Bow of short films and performances.

openfest

 

Shane Boyle

Elections Watch: Keep an eye out for events popping up in London about the US elections in the run up to polling day on 8 November, it’s sure to be a fascinating time politically.

 

 

3 Book Launches Coming Up including Star Trek: The Human Frontier

Here’s a quick round up of some of the book launches coming up in autumn 2016 within our School and beyond…

Star Trek: The Human Frontier by Michele Barrett & Duncan Barrett

Thursday 8 September – Charterhouse Square, London EC1

RSVP here

Our very own Professor Michèle Barrett with her son Duncan Barrett is launching an updated version of Star Trek: The Human Frontier a study of humanity through the lens of the popular TV and film series.

 

‘Star Trek has been subject to a lot of scrutiny by literary and cultural critics … The bad conscience that many have about serious discussion of popular culture means that Star Trek can still be read simplistically, as a stalking-horse for denouncing the modernity of the American century. The Barretts are more subtle. A television series is a product of a variety of creators and so, inevitably, a rich complex of signs, hints and idealisms. There is no final reading of Star Trek, just an endless journey.’

–          Book of the Day, The Independent

Karl Marx: Greatness and Illusion by Professor Gareth Stedman Jones

Tuesday 4 October from 6.30pm – ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre, QMUL Mile End Campus

Book a free ticket here

Our friends in the School of History are hosting a book launch with their tutor Professor Stedman Jones’ (author of this new Marx biography) joining Dr Tristram Hunt MP (author of a recent biography of Friedrich Engels) to debate around the issues raised in the book.

 

Urban Music and Entrepreneurship: Beats, Rhymes and Young People’s Enterprise by Joy White

Wednesday 19 October – Bow Arts Centre

Book a free ticket here

A local launch of a key study in grime music and its related enterprise as a key component of the urban music economy at the lovely Bow Arts Centre.

 

Did we miss a book launch? Please drop us an email and we’ll add in.

Meet the School of English and Drama at our October Open Day

Our autumn open day on Saturday 8 October 2016 is now open for registration and we’d be delighted to meet you then.

Register here

Open Day – Saturday 8 October 2016 – 10am-4pm

Get to know our Undergraduate programmes and take a tour of our East London campus on our college open day in October.

At our open day you can get the chance to:

  • Soak in the world of Queen Mary’s English and Drama programmes with some taster seminars.
  • Understand the application process and ask any burning questions to our friendly academic staff team.
  • Most importantly meet our students who can share their own experiences of our programmes.

Register online here

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George Oliver Readshaw from QMTC on Monkhouse at the Edinburgh Fringe

Monkhouse is one of four shows on its way to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe with the Queen Mary Theatre Company.

We caught up with George Oliver Readshaw to talk about creating the show and the build up to the festival thus far…

If you’re not up at the fringe be sure to reserve a ticket for the preview happening on Friday 5 August at 7pm.


Tell us about Monkhouse the show you’re taking up to the Edinburgh Fringe for 2016? What will an audience experience?

Monkhouse is a one-room-whodunnit-thriller-black-comedy-1960s-period-piece-theatrical-slap-in-the-face. It follows six horrible cockney kids hiding from an unknown gunman in their school gym.

While writing the script and compiling ideas it was incredibly important to me that this was a one hour show squeezed into 45 minutes. Our slot at the Edinburgh Fringe is exactly one hour, and they are very strict, so that includes getting the audience (hopefully in their thousands) seated, getting all the props and set ready after the previous show, and then vice versa. So really we have 45 minutes tops to get a show done. That’s not very long. So it’s vital that the audience can laugh, cry and generally live every moment as much as they can and as quickly as they can. So an audience can expect a super-charged, high tempo assault on their senses. That said, I’m a big fan of the theatrical ‘pause’, so we’ve made time for a few of those too.

 

What’s been the biggest thing you’ve learned so far in preparing for the Edinburgh fringe?

Research. DO YOUR RESEARCH. Be it promotional material, costume design, voice, lexicon, where one wears one’s trousers, the past is a different country and details are vital. We’ve played fast and loose with a couple of things, but we are really trying to create an authentic 1960s London aesthetic. The world of the play has to be compelling and true as well as sexy and cool, and the research side, as tedious as it can be, is so so important to any piece.

 

How do you think being in the QMTC helps your future career?

Immeasurably. I’m lucky enough to be continuing my studies at drama school this September and I know I would never be anywhere near that were it not for the opportunities offered by QMTC. Our university has a deservedly well renowned reputation for its drama department, and the plethora of performance styles that you are exposed to here is just phenomenal. I’ve seen my friends doing all sorts on stage, and the talent that lies here at QM is pretty inspiring. I’ve been involved in plays by Terrence Rattigan, Edward Albee, Sondheim, Shakespeare and most importantly some supremely talented writers and directors who are students just like me. This is kind of what it’s about really. Making plays with your mates. I would say that QMTC has put me exactly where I want to be.

 

Tell us about your time at Queen Mary and how you came to study with us. What have been your highlights so far studying drama at Queen Mary?

Well I am actually an English student but in honesty have spent the vast majority of my university life in the Pinter Studio. Basically all of it. I should pay rent there. But my highlights have been my experiences at the Edinburgh Fringe. I’ve been lucky enough to be involved in two really interesting and funny fringe shows, both with fantastic people, all of whom are big friends of mine still. It’s such a great thing that QM offers, you get to take something that you have made and show it to the wider world at the biggest arts festival on the planet. Plus it’s the biggest party on the planet.

 

Find out how to book tickets for the Monkhouse London preview

Find out more about the Queen Mary Theatre Company