Welcome Back Returning Students in 2018/19 – Key Information

Hello returning second and third years as well as new students coming into these years!

Here’s a few things you should know to help you start:

Timetables

Teaching starts on Monday 24 September but remember to look up your timetable here on QMPlus or in the app.

If you have any questions or need help please come and see us in ArtsOne 3rd floor reception or contact us.

 

#SEDMOVIENIGHT | Tuesday 25 September – 6-8pm | ArtsTwo Foyer and Lecture Theatre

Relax and unwind with your fellow students watching a movie voted for by you! There’s free drinks and snacks and you could win some ace prizes in our raffle.

RSVP on Facebook

 

Show and Tell | Wednesday 26 September – 6-8pm | ArtsOne Lecture Theatre and Foyer

A new and exciting series of short TED-style talks hosted by the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary University of London.

Speakers for 26 September:

  • Ema Boswood: Producer at Marlborough Theatre (Drama graduate)
  • Jade French: Researcher (English PhD)
  • James Lamont: TV writer and creator of The Amazing Adventures of Gumball (English graduate)
  • Zoe McGee: Literature Researcher at QMUL
  • Jen Harvie: Professor of Contemporary Theatre and Performance

Book online

Listen to our Show and Tell #1 Podcast

Show and Tell is a series of TED-talk style events where speakers from the arts, humanities and creative industries tell their stories at Queen Mary University of London.

This episode features publishing wizz Sarah Garnham, poet Bridget Minamore and dance artistic director Alex Whitley. Full biogs below.

The show is introduced by Patricia Hamilton, Charlie Pullen and features Rupert Dannreuther from School of English and Drama at Queen Mary.

Rupert Dannreuther
Rupert is responsible for marketing within Queen Mary’s School of English and Drama. He has worked for numerous organisations including Cineworld, Hackney Empire, The Yard Theatre and Rose Bruford College. In his spare time he runs To Do List a website about offbeat things to do in London.
todolist.org.uk

Sarah Garnham
Sarah graduated from QMUL with an English degree in 2016. She now works as a PR Executive in the busy children’s books department at Egmont Publishing and has worked for other publishers including Penguin Random House, HarperCollins and Canongate.
uk.linkedin.com/in/sarahjanegarnham

Bridget Minamore
Bridget Minamore is a British-Ghanaian writer from south-east London. She is a poet, critic, essayist, and journalist, often writing about pop culture, theatre, race and class. Titanic (Out-Spoken Press), her debut pamphlet of poems on modern love and loss, was published in May 2016.
bridgetminamore.com

Alexander Whitley
Alexander Whitley is a London-based choreographer working at the cutting edge of British contemporary dance. As artistic director of Alexander Whitley Dance Company he has developed a reputation for a bold interdisciplinary approach to dance making. He has also created work for several of the UK’s leading companies including the Royal Ballet, Rambert, Balletboyz, Candoco and Birmingham Royal Ballet.
www.alexanderwhitley.com

Show and Tell – Inspiring Mini Talks at QMUL

Show and Tell is a new and exciting series of free inspiring talks about studying and working in the arts and humanities

More information and book online here: showandtellqmul.eventbrite.co.uk – see the full programme below

Featuring short and engaging talks from academic researchers, broadcasters, creative writers, and theatre practitioners. Show and Tell is a celebration of arts and humanities education and the creative industries for those interested in studying or working in literature, theatre, art, media, and culture more broadly. The evening promises to be entertaining and relaxed. Speakers will each deliver a TED-style talk, and these will be followed by a chance for guests to ask questions, before the evening ends with socialising and networking over refreshments. Show and Tell runs on the evenings of the 5, 12, 19, and 26 of September 2018, taking place between 18:00 and 20:00 at the Arts One Building on the Mile End Road of Queen Mary’s Mile End campus.

Everyone is welcome from sixth-form students, new QMUL freshers, alumni, school teachers, researchers and anyone who has a general interest in the arts and humanities.

If you have any questions or would like to register a group please email: showandtell@qmul.ac.uk

Sadly you missed…

Wednesday 5 September

  • Sarah Garnham: Publicity Executive, Egmont Publishing
  • Alexander Whitley: Artistic Director of Alexander Whitley Dance Company
  • Bridget Minamore: British-Ghanaian writer from south-east London.

Wednesday 12 September

  • Edie Edmundson: Puppeteer at Shakespeare’s Globe (Drama graduate)
  • Susheila Nasta: Founding Editor at Wasafiri Magazine; Professor of Modern & Contemporary Literature at QMUL & Emeritus at Open University
  • Raifa Rafiq: co-creator of successful Mostly Lit podcast (English graduate)
  • Emma Shapiro: Migration Researcher and Archive Specialist
  • Hetta Howes: Lecturer and Researcher in Medieval Literature at City, University of London

Wednesday 19 September

  • Shahidha Bari: BBC Broadcaster, Senior Lecturer in Romanticism at QMUL
  • Mojisola Adebayo: Lecturer in Drama, Theatre and Performance at QMUL
  • Karina Lickorish Quinn: PhD Student in Creative Writing at QMUL
  • Billy Barrett: Theatre-maker, Breach Theatre and MA Theatre and Performance student

Book online

Wednesday 26 September

  • Ema Boswood: Producer at Marlborough Theatre (Drama graduate)
  • Jade French: PhD Student in English at QMUL
  • James Lamont: TV writer and creator of The Amazing Adventures of Gumball (English graduate)
  • Zoe McGee: PhD Student in English at QMUL
  • Jen Harvie: Professor of Contemporary Theatre and Performance

SED Guide to Summer including Edinburgh Festival and London Events

Here’s a rundown of some great things to do this summer 2018 including events featuring our students, staff and alumni.

London Events

The Refugee Tales | Wednesday 11 July 2018, All day | Various locations

The Refugee Tales, which campaigns against indefinite immigration detention holds an annual walk in solidarity with refugees, asylum seekers and detainees. The walk, which is in collaboration with people who have experienced the UK asylum system, aims to reclaim the landscape of South East England for the language of welcome.

Taking Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales as a model, the walk is punctuated by contributions en route by writers. On 11 July the walk comes to east London. At Cable Street, Nadia Valman (English) will give a talk on the Battle of Cable Street, and at QMUL, the writer Iain Sinclair will give a lecture called ‘What the world is telling us. And why we won’t listen.’ (Wednesday 11 July, 12 noon, Arts Two Lecture Theatre).

Daniella Harrison at Comedy Lab Sharing | Saturday 21 July 2018, 12pm | Soho Theatre | £5

Participants of the Sketch course have put together new material for this one-off performance.

Nocturnal Creatures | Saturday 21 July, 18:00 onwards | Whitechapel Gallery

Nocturnal Creatures is a new, free contemporary arts festival, bringing together performance, video, sculpture and sound. Originating from Whitechapel Gallery, cultural and historic venues in the vicinity are transformed, opening their doors late into the night.

Rosie Vincent: London is Vomit | Friday 3 August 2018, 18:45 | Rich Mix London

As part of Rich Mix TAKEOVER, Drama graduate Rosie Vincent is regurgitating her ongoing photography project into a new performance. Comprised of over 200 photographs, London is Vomit continues to explore the sickness of the city whilst celebrating the resilience and endurance of the urban body.

Figs in Wigs at Raze Collective Weekend | Saturday 11 August | Southbank Centre

Drama grads and Guardian favourites Figs in Wigs curate a day of fun on the South Bank.

Make More Festival | Thursday 23-Monday 27 August 2018, various times | Victoria Park

MAKEMORE is London’s first maker festival celebrating all forms of making and doing. Through hands-on creative experiences you can discover what kind of maker you are. Be fuelled by the energy of making, live music and the best in bars and street food. Your entry ticket gets you access to everyone appearing that day with a full programme of live demos, taster sessions and immersive experiences.

Edinburgh Festival

Breach Theatre: It’s True, It’s True, It’s True | 20-26 August 2018 | Underbelly Cowgate

Fringe First winners Breach Theatre’s new show hits the Edinburgh fringe directed by our MA student Billy Barrett. ‘Blending myth, history and contemporary commentary, this is the story of how a woman took revenge through her art to become one of the most successful painters of her generation.’.

Queen Mary Theatre Company at Edinburgh Fringe | 11-26 August 2018

Our very own Queen Mary Theatre Company (QMTC) are bringing 4 shows to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in August:

  • A&E: A fast-paced clowning comedy caper, devised with junior doctors and nurses inspired by Michele Gondry and Green Wing.
  • Deadline: Imagine knowing when you’re going to die, _exactly _when you’re going to die. It would make you live your life to the fullest, right? Enter a world where at 16 you find out your date. A date that determines the rest of your future, a date you can’t escape from.
  • Same Old Same Oldies: Three Northerners and three Southerners residing in one nursing home. How could they possibly get along? Brimming with awkward disputes and one particular loud mouth amongst the group, these oldies always find something to complain about.
  • Rat Race: Rat Race is a dark tragicomedy set in a rat cage that is at the center of a badly handled experiment.

Keep an eye out for London previews details 2 and 3 of August! Exact times are still to be confirmed but probably from 6pm!

Sh*t Theatre: Dollywould | 14-26 August 2018 | Summerhall

Queen Mary fgaduates and multi award-winning duo Sh!t Theatre return with their 100% sell-out show from 2017. It’s mainly about their love of Dolly Parton and also about cloning, branding, immortality and death.

 

Some top tips from our QMUL team

1) Go for a swim at London Fields Lido just a short journey from QMUL

2) Walk/run the London High Line – foundations of the northern line that were never used from Alexandra Palace to Finsbury park for great views

English and Drama Taster Sessions Announced for Open Days – 22-23 June 2018

We are excited to launch our free taster programme at our open days this Friday 22 and Saturday 23 June.

To sign up please head to Arts Two foyer from 10am.

Friday 22 June 2018

English

11.30

a) Lecture: Othello: Race and Religion – Professor Jerry Brotton

From the late twentieth century, criticism and productions of Othello focused almost exclusively on the tragic hero’s blackness, in an attempt to challenge the racist assumptions that have defined the play since the seventeenth century. But ‘race’ has a history, and its meaning for Shakespeare was very different from our modern understanding of the term. This session examines key passages from the play and suggests that what we see as ‘race’ in Othello is a complex mix of Elizabethan beliefs and assumptions about ethnicity and religion. If we see Othello as a Christian convert from Islam, and read the play alongside ambivalent English relations with Muslims in this period, the play becomes far more complex and, in our time, even more relevant than we have come to believe.

Location: Arts Two Building, 3.20

b) Lecture: Time in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway – Professor Mark Currie

How do novels imagine time? Focusing on excerpts from Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway, we’ll be exploring the many ways this text represents subjective time – thinking about how linear time is disrupted by flashbacks and flash-forwards, evoking the flux of thought.

Location: Arts Two Building, 2.17

13:45

c) Lecture: John Donne’s Poetry – Relationship Trouble – Professor David Colclough

Parting from a lover; trying to get through to God; imagining the soul leave the body – even getting undressed or being woken up too early: Donne’s poems return continually to problems with relationships.  They do so by thinking about language, persuasion, poetic form, and audiences. This session will focus on a selection of poems and help you to analyse the way they work, making reference to Donne’s biography and to the historical context in which he was writing.

Location: Arts Two Building, 3.20

d) Seminar: Witchy Women in Macbeth – Professor Andrea Brady

This class will investigate the different functions of witchcraft in Shakespeare’s Scottish play: as an exciting spectacle; as a form of flattery; and as a kind of rebellion, both against the king and the patriarchal rule of the family. We’ll think about how the witches embody some cultural anxieties about women’s bodies in this period, particularly by focussing on Lady Macbeth’s ‘unsex me here’ speech (I.v).

Location: Arts Two Building, 2.17

Drama

11.30

e) Seminar: Site-Specific Theatre: Must This Be the Place? – Dr Michael McKinnie

Site-specific theatre is theatre that consciously explores the unique sites in which it happens, frequently outside of conventional theatre spaces.  In recent years theatre makers have created performances in places such as courthouses, private homes, castles, railway stations, and more.  This practical workshop will explore different techniques for making site-specific theatre, using the environment in and around Queen Mary’s Mile End campus.  OR This seminar will explore some of the challenges that site-specific theatre poses, and asks whether it is as innovative as it is often claimed to be.

Location: Arts Two Building – Film and Drama Studio (FADS)
f) Seminar: Walking in the City – Dr Catherine Silverstone

Artists have used the practice of walking in their work, inviting spectators to see the city (and perhaps themselves) differently. We will look at ‘walking performances’, focussing particularly on gender, sexuality, participation and spectatorship.

Location: Arts One Building – Pinter Studio

13.45

g) Practical Workshop: Devising from Games – Dr Mojisola Adebayo

This will be a playful workshop exploring how to devise plays and create performance material from playing games. We will explore exercises that combine Theatre of the Oppressed and Physical Theatre techniques, made accessible for all. We will explore how playing and play making can help to generate a sense of ubuntu (humanity / human connection) towards social and political change.

Location: Arts Two Building – Film and Drama Studio (FADS)
h) Practical Workshop: Keeping the Plates Spinning – Dr Julia Bardsley

A practical look at processes of performance that embrace complexity and disruption. What creative opportunities present themselves when we deliberately let those plates fall?

Location: Arts One Building – Pinter Studio

 

Saturday 23 June 2018

English

11.30

a) Seminar: Romeo and Juliet’s First Meeting – Professor Warren Boutcher

This workshop will combine a close-reading of the scene in which Romeo and Juliet first meet with a viewing of two filmed versions: a recent production at Shakespeare’s Globe, and Baz Luhrmann’s 1996 update.

Location: Arts Two Building, 3.20

b) Lecture: Happy 200th Birthday, Frankenstein – Dr Shahidha Bari

200 years after the publication  of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, this lecture explores the themes of the novel and examines the different ways in which it has been read over the course of its history.  The lecture rehearses some of the classic feminist readings of the novel, as well as the Marxist accounts of Frankenstein’s labour. It reaches to modern eco-critical readings of the novel’s landscape and asks whether it is a “creature” or “monster”  that Shelley creates.

Location: Arts Two Building, 2.17

13:45

c) Seminar: James Joyce’s Ulysses: Writing Modern Consciousness – Dr Rhiannon Moss

What relationship is there between our inner selves and the world in which we live? How can writing seek represent internal subjectivity? Is it possible to know the interiority of another? This session will explore these questions by looking at passages from James Joyce’s Ulysses, one of the most important and influential works of modern literature. Joyce innovated and experimented with literary techniques to represent the complexity of experience in the modern world, and to give the reader an intimate experience of the minds of his three everyday heroes. This session will give an insight into his writing of modern consciousness, and will begin to explore the central questions you will discuss as literary scholars.

Location: Arts Two Building, 2.17

d) Seminar: Introducing Literary Theory – Dr Molly MacDonald

What is literary theory? How does theory help us read literature? Throughout the history of literature, there have arisen various competing interpretations of literary texts and, with that, the need to adjudicate between rival interpretations.  ‘Theory’ has therefore emerged as a means of justifying particular interpretations over and against others. This session will offer an introductory session to using literary theory, and will model the kinds of lessons you can expect to encounter on our first-year module, Reading, Theory and Interpretation.

Location: Arts Two Building, 3.20

Drama

11.30

e) Seminar: What is Performance Art? – Dr Dominic Johnson

In Performance Art, an artist often uses her or his body as raw material and abandons the traditional tendencies towards acting, characterisation, and narrative that typify performances in the theatre. We’ll explore some of the key experiments that Performance Art has included in the twentieth century.

Location: Arts One Building – Pinter Studio

f) Practical Workshop: Audience Participation in Contemporary Theatre – Dr Daniel Oliver

In recent years many theatre and performance practitioners have aimed to create immersive, interactive, and participatory experiences for their audiences. We will explore the ethics, aesthetics and methods of such audience involvement through practical exercises, short readings, and discussion.

Location: Arts Two Building – Film and Drama Studio (FADS)

13:45

g) Seminar: Histories of Emotion in the Theatre – Dr Penelope Woods

Theatres are sites and spaces of emotion. But the kinds of emotion that have been sought and produced in theatres around the world through history has varied greatly. How do we begin to examine and research ’emotion at the theatre’? And what significance does this investigation of emotion in theatres around the world through history have?

Location: Arts Two Building – Film and Drama Studio (FADS)

 

If you have any questions or need help on the day please do get in touch…

Rupert Dannreuther
Web and Marketing Administrator

School of English and Drama
Queen Mary University of London

sed-web@qmul.ac.uk
+44 (0)20 7882 8910

Free events and workshops at Peopling the Palace(s) festival 2018

Peopling the Palace(s) | ArtsOne, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS | 11-17 June 2018

A festival of radical performance, workshops and events at Queen Mary University of London

Highlights include:

Full listings: http://bit.ly/peoplingthepalaces18 and below…

Mon 11Tue 12Wed 13Thu 14Fri 15 | Sat 16 | Sun 17

 

MONDAY 11 JUNE

DIY School 2018

10am – 8.00pm | Arts One, QMUL – Mile End

DIY High School is here to help give QMUL students, graduates and the wider community the skills to get ahead in the creative industries.

This year there are 2 workshops one in graphic design using Adobe Photoshop and the second in Video Editing.

Plus, there will be a 1-2-1 session to get specific help for your project, CV or online presence.

Register online

 

Race at the Juncture Colloquium – Patrick Flanery

Graduate Centre | 9am  – 5pm

Details coming soon.

 

TUESDAY 12 JUNE

Backstage Utopias: Thinking Alternatively about Management at the Theatre

11am – 5pm  | Film and Drama Studio, ArtsTwo Building, QMUL – Mile End

A day long symposium with lunch and a drinks reception

Theatre is a place that has many backstages. Out of public view, backstage work is shaped by systems of management and structured by what takes place in other kinds of theatre spaces, such as the rehearsal room, the management office, the dressing-room, the funding institution, the gallery and the audition.

Recent events, such as the Weinstein scandal, and public debates on the politics of casting in theatre and film, have made visible how backstage work is structured by systems of management that are structured through relations of power, economics and, sometimes, exploitation.

This day-long closed symposium asks how we might think differently. Who are the managers in the arts? What are the histories of the manager? How might we create new or different management structures, in order to rethink the conditions of work at the theatre? What other forms of hierarchy are possible or desirable? Is management a job, a person or a system? How do management systems in the theatre relate to broader management cultures and practices? What is our backstage utopia?

Following our symposium on ‘Collaboration’ last year, we invite you to join us for a day of debate between academics, artists, producers, and institutions. The event will take place between 11-5pm on Tuesday June 12th at Queen Mary’s Mile End campus – participants are welcome to join us for all or part of the day. We will be providing lunch and a drinks reception and hope that you can join us to dream differently.

Register online

 

WEDNESDAY 13 JUNE

Performance and Mental Health: Perspectives and Practices

Curated by Daniel Oliver

3-6pm – Pinter Studio | Arts One, QMUL – Mile End

The MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health course at Queen Mary University of London presents a series of talks, presentations and provocations on the theme of performance, art and mental health. There will also be an opportunity for those interested in the course to speak with staff about the innovative MSc programme.

Refreshments Provided

Hosted by Dr Daniel Oliver, with presentations by Bobby Baker, Dr Bridget Escolme, Jeremy Weller, Jo Hauge, Lucy Hutson, and Dr Maria Turri

 

Women’s Voices in Parliament: representation in the year of #Vote100

6pm – 8pm | Octagon, QMUL – Mile End

One hundred years since the Representation of the People Act, which first granted women the right to vote in UK parliamentary elections, what kind of space do powerful institutions grant to women’s voices? What progress has been made, and what still needs to be done?

Hosted by Queen Mary University of London, this mini-symposium brings together academics from across the fields of Drama, Politics, and Gender and Media Studies, alongside artists, performers and students, inviting them to tackle urgent and challenging questions of representation.

Join us in the historic space of the Octagon, formally the library of the People’s Palace, for rousing soapbox talks and thought-provoking interventions. Make your own voice heard in the closing open-floor debate.

Contributors include Sarah Childs, Jen Harvie, Rainbow Murray, Lise Olson, Naomi Paxton, Nirmal Purwar, Nephertiti Schandorf and representatives from the recent occupation of the Octagon: Jemima Hindmarch and Lewis Williams.

Register here

 

THURSDAY 14  JUNE

 

PhD Colloquium

10am – 4.30pm | RR2, Arts One

Details coming soon.

 

Max Dyspraxe Neurodivergent Revolution Fun Time Discussion Time Travel

Noon – 7pm | RR3, Arts One, QMUL – Mile End

A hotch potch dyspraxic day of discussions, presentations, rituals and workshops around the topic of dyspraxia, performance art, neurodiversity, time travel and the forthcoming neurodivergent dysutopia (sp).

Free and open to everyone. Pop in and Out. But PLEASE BOOK A TICKET as space is very limited!!

Important Note: This event experiments with embracing elements of dyspraxia commonly framed as ‘dysfuncitonal’ – and therefore may feel clumsy, awkward or chaotic at times. The majority of it will take place in a windowless black box space, in which a shiny, cumbersome, dripping time machine/long table will be installed, alongside cosier den-based spaces for more comfortable and intimate conversations. There will also be a break-out space in a room with windows. Please email d.oliver@qmul.ac.uk with any enquiries, including access requirements.

Register here

Download the full programme

 

The Sexual Cultures Research Group Presents: Heather Love – Beginning With Stigma

6 – 8pm | Arts One Lecture Theatre, QMUL – Mile End

This talk is taken from the introduction to Love’s new book, Underdogs, which aims to historicize the rise of queer theory and elaborate its debts to post-WWII social science, in particular the field of deviance studies.

 

FRIDAY 15 JUNE

First Flights

5.45pm – 10pm | Pinter, RR2 & RR3, QMUL – Mile End

First Flights is an interdisciplinary artistic platform for current Queen Mary students and recent graduates to showcase their work in a professional festival. Ranging from confessional theatre to durational pieces, this is an evening of first forays into professional public performance.

Register online

 

Reading Room_03: Bardsley v Maeterlinck | Social Insect Trilogy | part i. The Life of the Bee

3 – 8pm, Come + Go | Film Studio, Arts One, QMUL – Mile End

an APIAN PARADOX

envisaged & executed by Julia Bardsley with Moa Johansson

DJ Sisters & the Q | apicultural vinyl | stylus venom sounds | drone doom |

throat uttering | vibrating manoeuvres| healing & hurting | caressing & cruelty |

savage & sage | cellular worker secretions | mellifluous agitations | feminine ecology |

F-economies dismantle T | unexpected reversal | female bee-ing | tended not tamed

RSVP on Facebook

 

Independent Practice Project (Master’s at QMUL) Slide Show

All day | Arts One Foyer, QMUL – Mile End

All day

 

SATURDAY 16 JUNE

 

Alumni Platform

From 5pm | ArtsOne and Film and Drama Studio, ArtsTwo, QMUL – Mile End

The Alumni platform welcomes back alumni of QMUL for a day of performance, exhibitions, and experimentation.

Register here

an APIAN PARADOX

Reading Room_03

Bardsley v Maeterlinck | Social Insect Trilogy | part i. The Life of the Bee

envisaged & executed by Julia Bardsley with Moa Johansson

3 – 8pm | Film Studio, Arts One, QMUL – Mile End | Come + Go

See Friday 15 for listing

 

If It Were The Apocalypse I’d Eat You To Stay Alive – Martin O’Brien Performance and Book Launch

8.30 – 10pm, Film and Drama Studio, Arts Two, QMUL – Mile End

Martin is performing If It Were The Apocalypse I’d Eat You To Stay Alive at Peopling the Palace Festival, QMUL. It was originally made in 2015 whilst he was Artsadmin Bursary Artist and funded by Arts Council England. Martin has performed this piece in the UK, Europe and Canada and it changes significantly every time he does it.

There will be a drinks reception after the performance and a chance to buy the book ‘Survival of the Sickest: The Art of Martin O’Brien’ at a special rate!

 

 

SUNDAY 17 JUNE

The Precariousness of Photography: Manuel Vason – One Day Workshop

£30 per person | 10am-5pm | Pinter and RR2, Arts One QMUL

Looking at photography from a performative perspective we will explore strategies, exercises and activities to subvert the fixity, authority and rules of the photographic medium by means of performance. If photography since its origin has been compared to painting for its ability to copy and/or replicate reality, we will use performance to critically analyse and practice photography as a tool for the construction of multiple, fluid identities, and to expand imagination instead of to confine it within the predictable.

No previous photography experience required.

Reserve your place

This is a paid event. Please bring cash to purchase a ticket on arrival. Cost per place: £30.00

English and Drama Newsletter – June 2018

Welcome to the June 2018 edition of our School of English and Drama newsletter.

Highlights this month include Open Days, Peopling the Palace(s) Festival, a #VOTE100 debate in the Octagon and a Performance and Mental Health event.

EVENTS | NEWS | LINKS

Photo above: Drama graduate Jo Hauge by Julia Brown – she is presenting at Performance and Mental Health.

Events

OPEN EVENTS

MSc in Creative Arts and Mental Health Presents
Performance and Mental Health: Perspectives and Practices
6.30pm Wednesday 6 June 2018
Arts Two Lecture Theatre, QMUL – Mile End Campus

The MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health course at Queen Mary University of London presents a series of talks, presentations and provocations on the theme of performance, art and mental health. Speakers include: Bobby Baker, Dr Bridget Escolme, Jeremy Weller, Jo Hauge, Lucy Hutson, and Dr Maria Turri.

Register

Undergraduate Open Days
Friday 22-Saturday 23 June 2018, 10:00-16:00
QMUL – Mile End Campus

We will be hosting taster sessions and subject talks about English and Drama, and staff will be available to talk through the course and life at Queen Mary. Plus,  campus tours, events and activities for potential future students.

Register

PEOPLING THE PALACE(S)

Department of Drama
Peopling the Palace(s) Festival
Monday 11-Sunday 17 June 2018
QMUL – Mile End

Book now for events, performances and conversations including:

•  DIY HIGH SCHOOL (11 June): two workshops in creative skills (Photoshop and Video Editing) and a bespoke feedback session on creative projects and CVs.
•  Women’s Voices in Parliament (13 June): A #VOTE100 representation debate special in our stunning Octagon space. Contributors include Sarah Childs, Jen Harvie, Rainbow Murray, Lise Olson, Naomi Paxton, Nirmal Purwar and Nephertiti Schandorf.
•  Performance and Mental Health: Perspectives and Practices (13 June): A series of talks, presentations and provocations on the theme of performance, art and mental health.
•  First Flights (15 June) and Alumni Platform (16 June): Free graduating student and alumni performances in the Pinter studio.
•  The Precariousness of Photography: Manuel Vason (17 June): A photography and performance workshop with leading performance photographer Manuel Vason.

See the full programme of events

MORE EVENTS IN JUNE

Space Dogs
4-6 June 2018, 19:00
Theatre N16 at Styx, Tottenham Hale

Written by Drama graduate Sebastiao Marques Lopes and featuringcstudents past. The dog-eat-dog world of 1960s politics, the private battles of the era’s superpowers, and the seemingly never-ending Cold War are realised in this tale of survival, sacrifice and sausages.

QM Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies
Suvir Kaur (Pennsylvania): Apostrophe as a Theory of History
Friday 8 June 2018, 15:00-17:00
Lock-keepers Cottage, QMUL – Mile End

“Personification has attracted continuing critical attention as a figure for the power of poetry to animate the inanimate and to give voice to the voiceless. In turn, apostrophe has been read as exemplary of lyrical voice, and of those forms of poetic address that model self-referential circuits of poetic utterance.”

Arts and Culture at QMUL
Queen Mary Arts and Culture Annual Lecture by Dr Maria Balshaw CBE
Friday 8 June 2018, 18:00
Peston Lecture Theatre, Graduate Centre, QMUL – Mile End

Tate Director Maria Balshaw – honorary professor for the MA Creative Industries and Arts Organisation programme from September 2018 – gives the Queen Mary Arts and Culture Annual Lecture.

Arts and Culture at QMUL
La Mer (Four hands, Two dancers, Two Films)
12-13 June 2018, various times
Great Hall, People’s Palace, QMUL – Mile End

Celebrating 2018 as the 100th anniversary of Claude Debussy’s death, his masterwork La Mer (partly composed when Debussy stayed in Eastbourne) is realised in a newly created live performance event that combines the composer’s version for piano duet, with dance and film.

You are warmly invited to attend one or all of the events below:
Full Open Dress Rehearsal: Tuesday, 12th June 2018, at 5.30pm.
Contemporary Dance Workshop: Wednesday, 13th June 2018, 11am–1pm. Please note: 20 pleaces only. Booking essential.
Performances of La Mer: Wednesday, 13th June 2018, at 5.30pm & 6.30pm.

The Sexual Cultures Research Group Presents: Heather Love – ‘Beginning With Stigma’
Thursday 14 June 2018, 18:00-20:00
ArtsOne Lecture Theatre, QMUL – Mile End

This talk is taken from the introduction to Love’s new book, Underdogs, which aims to historicize the rise of queer theory and elaborate its debts to post-WWII social science, in particular the field of deviance studies.

Battersea Audio Chatback: Making Change for Care and Care Leavers
Monday 25 June 2018, 18:00 – 19:30
Battersea Arts Centre

Young people in Wandsworth are working with verbatim techniques to produce performance that shares their experience of care services. Join us in the Battersea Arts Centre Audio Tour to hear their testimonies – and take part in discussion of what can change for the better in local authority care and education. An ARHC-funded project led by Maggie Inchley (Drama) and People’s Palace Projects.

First Bites: STARS
29-30 June 2018
Ovalhouse, Oval

Mojisola Adebayo will be presenting a staged reading of her latest play STARS at Ovalhouse Theatre (near Oval tube) on June 29 (7.30pm) and 30 (2.30 and 7.30pm with BSL interpretation).

STARS is the story of an old lady who goes into space… in search of her own orgasm. STARS is supported by Queen Mary Drama Department, the Centre for Public Engagement and Arts Council England.

See all of our events coming up

 

News from the School

Susheila Nasta (English – Wasafiri Magazine) has been involved as a consultant on British Library’s Windrush: Songs in a Strange Land exhibition, recently featured in the Guardian. Wasafiri Magazine is hosting Windrush Women: Past and Present, an evening of poetry and readings inspired by the lives of female writers from the Windrush era, at the British Library on Monday 25 June.

Zoë McGee (English PhD Candidate) was named the winner of QMUL Three Minute Thesis. The competitors had just three minutes to tell a non-specialist audience and a panel of judges about their research and results. Zoë will now go on to represent QMUL in Vitae’s online national semi-finals, which will run in July and August. Six finalists will present their Three Minute Theses at the Vitae International Conference in September.
Matthew Rubery (English) has had an article published in New Literary History ‘Ulysses, Blindness, and Accessible Modernism‘.

Mojisola Adebayo has been made a Literary Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Read more in the press release.

Dominic Johnson (Drama) has been shortlisted for The TaPRA Prize for Editing (Edited Collection or Special Issue) for his co-edited book:  It’s all Allowed: the Performances of Adrian Howells (Live Art Development Agency and Intellect, 2016).

Catherine Maxwell (English) talks about her book Scents and Sensibility: Perfume in Victorian Literary Culture in the May books round-up on Irish radio station Newstalk. Listen here from 09:20.

See more on the SED blog

 

Links

1. There is free access to Adnan Sarwar’s ‘Back To Iraq’ published in Wasafiri Issue 94. Adnan Sarwar’s BBC series ‘Journey in the Danger Zone: Iraq’ is currently airing on BBC 2 Sundays at 9pm. Read online here

2. Drama graduates Hugo Aguirre and Franciska Ery are presenting their show Asking for a Raise from 3 July at The Space.

3. Caine Prize nominee Makena Onjerika will be in conversation and reading her shortlisted story ‘Fanta Blackcurrant’ (published in Wasafiri) at SOAS 26 June, Willesden Library 28 June, and Africa Writes 30 June.

4. Guardian article Play staged in central London church explores parish’s gentrification was partially researched during director Gemma Kerr’s “Air B2B” residency in Brazil, hosted at Casa Rio by British Council Brazil and People’s Palace Projects.

5. Drama graduate Martha Pailing is performing her show Background People at Roundhouse in Camden as part of the Last Word Festival.

6. Wasafiri New Writing Prize deadline is fast approaching. Applications for Poetry, Fiction and Life Writing entries close on 13 July 2018.

7. Watch a clip from People’s Palace Projects’ With One Voice choir, made up of a group of people with experience of homelessness in Rio de Janeiro.

3 QMUL Drama Festivals: Plunge, IPP Festival & Peopling the Palaces

We have a smorgasbord of fresh new talent and experienced industry professionals coming up in these 3 festival in Spring-Summer 2018 at Queen Mary University of London.

Plunge Festival | 16-18 May 2018

As the graduating students of Queen Mary University of London prepare to depart campus and join the outside world. Plunge Festival is the final showing of work, featuring a rich variety of performance, installation, durational and site-specific projects.

See the full programme

 

IPP Festival | 19-20 May 2018

IPP festival of MA and MSc performances, taking place over this coming weekend (19-20 May 2018). The festival will conclude with drinks in the foyer outside FADS (Arts Two) after the last performance on the Sunday. It would be wonderful to see you there.

Link for booking: https://tinyurl.com/y9xlnegg

Please also note that Conall Borowski’s performance (Sunday, 4am in Lock Keepers) needs to be booked by email conall.borowski@virginmedia.com.

 

Peopling the Palaces Festival | 10-17 June 2018

We’ve got an incredible week of events lined up, including film screenings, discussions, interventions and performances.

The eclectic programme will showcase work from a range of academics, artists, current students and recent Queen Mary graduates.

Event Round Up: Remembering Natural Historian James Petiver (1665–1718)

Thursday 26 April 2018

This day meeting at the Linnean Society in Burlington House, Piccadilly marked the tercentenary of the death of James Petiver FRS, an important but often overlooked professional apothecary and compulsive natural historian in 18th-century London.

Petiver made significant contributions to multiple fields of natural history, above all botany and entomology. An assiduous correspondent and collector, he successfully cultivated sources of natural historical intelligence and material from the Americas to the East Indies.

On the 300th anniversary of his death, the meeting set out to remember James Petiver:

  • as a practising natural historian of substantial abilities and merit
  • as a collector and cataloguer of natural historical specimens with enduring significance
  • as a writer of both manuscript correspondence and published natural historical texts
  • as an apothecary whose professional and private scientific interests mutually informed each other
  • as a social networker both within London and across the globe
  • as an historical figure whose legacy has been contested and which is ripe for reconsideration

Speakers from universities and the museum sector assessed Petiver’s life and legacy by deploying a range of historical and scientific disciplinary perspectives. Topics addressed by the presentations included Petiver’s medical practice, his abilities and significance as a natural historian, his relationships with mariners and merchants (including slave-traders), and his innovative attempts to reach new audiences through book publication. The meeting was also privileged to welcome a direct descendent of James Petiver’s sister, Jane.The event was organised by Dr Richard Coulton (QMUL) and Dr Charlie Jarvis (Natural History Museum). Research presented at the meeting is due to be published in a forthcoming special issue of Notes and Records of the Royal Society (spring 2020).

Find out more about James Petiver in Richard’s blog post for the Royal Society

Download the full programme and abstracts

Watch podcasts from the event below…

Tate Exchange: Producing Memory: Maps, Materials, Belongings – Full Programme

Join us for provocative discussions, displays, workshops and screenings exploring how memory is produced in relation to material, objects and places

Join artists and researchers from Queen Mary University of London as we think together about the role of objects in the production, conservation and recollection of our individual memories, and those of our communities. A particular focus will be migrant and refugee art, and the challenges of producing and conserving a home and identity in circumstances of displacement.

Explore questions such as what does the ‘making’ in placemaking actually involve? What is the role of sensuality in the making of memories? How can digital technologies of mass production coexist with artisanal modes of making, and what is their relation to the production of cultural heritage?

Drop in to explore installations and exhibitions which will be on display daily or join us for a series of events and activities over our five day residency at Tate Exchange.

Displays (open every day):

  • Recordings from the Xingu

Enter our oca and embark on a journey to the Ipatse Village, home of the Kuikuro indigenous people in the Xingu region of Brazil. See photographs and listen to ambisonic sound recordings of the community’s daily life and traditions, and watch a video fly-through of scan data from around the Ipatse village, produced by Factum Foundation. The display will include a Virtual Reality installation by Brazilian coder Clelio de Paula about his residency in the Xingu (Sunday only, from 1-5pm).

  • Alda Terracciano’s Zelige Door on Golborne Road

Drop in and experience this interactive, multisensory installation which explores various aspects of Moroccan heritage and culture, each requiring a different sense to be experienced. It uses Augmented Reality and technologies related to the senses, to construct a living museum of cultural memories that reflects both the challenges of gentrification, and communal visions of a utopian space within the city.

  • Globe: Here Be Dragons and Fertig

Globe, on display in Tate Exchange, is a copper sphere housing four cameras. Artist Janetka Platun rolled Globe through the streets of East London recording journeys and conversations with the public about home and migration, territory and boundaries. The footage inspired two films: Here Be Dragons (27 mins) and Fertig (6 mins), which will be screened on a loop in the space.

  • Ink drawings by Sophie Herxheimer

Explore a display of ink drawings by artist Sophie Herxheimer which document the experiences of refugees.

Screenings, discussion and workshops

Add your story to Alda Terracciano’s evolving work on London Memory Routes.

Explore the theme of belonging through conversation and activities with artist Janetka Platun.

Join artist Sophie Herxheimer for a story collecting workshop and celebrate the new issue of Wasafiri Magazine with an evening of live literature.

Focusing on the needs of young people, join us for discussions and workshops exploring how spaces for participation and creativity can be produced.

Drop in for a map-making workshop inspired by the maps created by refugees to navigate their environments.

Come along to a screening of this powerful documentary about young Afghan refugees in Greece who transform discarded lifeboats and lifejackets into bags.

Drop in for a day of events exploring the Kuikuro indigenous people’s project to record and preserve the cultural heritage of their village in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil.

Show and Tell @ QMUL

A new and exciting series of talks for school and college students hosted by the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary University of London.

Show and Tell brings together influential academic teaching staff and industry professionals to deliver engaging and accessible talks for young people interested in working in the arts and possibly studying humanities subjects at university. Queen Mary staff working in a range of disciplines will share their cutting-edge research in short, thought-provoking presentations, and they will be joined by alumni offering insights into the work they do now in jobs across the creative sector.

Much like a TED Talk, these events are designed to be as entertaining as they are informative: they will provide a unique experience for school and college students to learn about the research being produced in universities and the careers graduates pursue after their studies.

Over the course of one evening, students can expect to hear from four speakers working in university disciplines including English, Drama, History, and Geography, and from industries such as journalism, theatre, fashion, and museums and galleries. They will also have the chance to network and meet the speakers and their peers over refreshments at a reception where they can discuss the evening’s talks, ask more questions, and find out about the journeys that current and former students have made to university and the world of work.

Show and Tell is primarily aimed at students aged 16-18 who are currently studying at A Level or equivalent at schools, sixth forms, and colleges, but we would welcome GCSE students too. This is a widening participation project and we hope it will encourage students who come from backgrounds that are underrepresented in higher education to think of applying to study arts and humanities degrees at Queen Mary and other Russell Group universities.  

We are keen to hear the views of teachers so that we can make this project as effective as it can possibly be. Please help us make Show and Tell a success by getting in touch and telling us what you think makes university outreach events work for you and your students. You can tell us what you think by completing our questionnaire here: https://goo.gl/forms/EkmXCKC5m9hN4kxS2

If you are student who would like to attend, or an alumnus who would like to speak at a Show and Tell event, please also contact us to find out more.

You can register your interest by emailing showandtell@qmul.ac.uk 

Call for Papers: Theatricality, Performance, and the State – 7-8 June 2018

Call for Papers: Theatricality, Performance, and the State – Queen Mary 7-8 June

“’The State must wither away.” Who says that? The State…’ He assumes a cunning, furtive expression, stands in front of the chair in which I am sitting – he is impersonating ‘the State’ – and says with a sly, sidelong glance at an imaginary interlocutor: ‘ I know I ought to wither away.’

Benjamin with Brecht, 22 June, 1938

“In order to work,” Samir Amin remarks, “capitalism requires the intervention of a collective authority representing capital as a whole. Therefore, the state cannot be separated from capitalism.” While seemingly self-evident, this insight sits at odds with a tendency in theatre and performance studies and in political theory towards what Mitchell Dean and Kaspar Villadsen, following Foucault, have diagnosed as ‘state-phobia’ (2016). In this framework, the state figures as an outmoded analytical category, to be replaced by neoliberal market forces and other de-centred analytics of power. Thus, theatre and performance – as well as the ‘creative economies’ more broadly – come to be evoked as either unwittingly complicit in the retraction of the state from governance and welfare (Bishop, 2012), or conversely held up as either instantiations of civil society (Jackson, 2011) or as an oppositional public sphere that has the potential to escape the state’s long arm (Balme, 2014).

 

While these interventions all offer useful insights into performance’s relationship to neoliberal governance models, the recurring oversight of the role of the state in its imbrication with both performance and discourses of theatricality runs the risk of eliding this relationship altogether. Yet, since Plato at least, the dangers and uses of theatre to real or idealised states has been a recurring feature in philosophical, governmental and political discourses. Moving beyond the focus on ‘anti-theatrical’ prejudice (Barish, 1981) which often informs the analysis of these discourses, what else might be uncovered through reflecting on the usefulness of theatre and performance for articulations of theories of statehood? Additionally, as posited by Amin, if the state cannot be separated from capitalism, what might be the value of discussing performance and theatre through (re)considering the state as central to the relationship between theatre and capitalism? Conversely, how might theories of performance and theatricality allow for a renewed understanding of the state’s position in globalized capitalism? Following on from this, how might reading the globalised economy alongside the ‘planetary extension of the state’ (Lefebvre, 1975) expand understandings of theatre’s political function across regional sites? How do states participate in the performance of the “world-configuring function,” (Balibar) of borders, especially considering the living legacies of colonialism and decolonization and the contemporary prevalence of geopolitical isolationism and border regimes? Can the state continue to be thought of a site of progressive struggle?

This conference aims to address an epistemological lacuna by bringing the modern state back to centre stage in thinking about and through theatre, theatricality and performance. We invite scholars to reflect on how the state limits, organizes, supports, and develops theatre and performance, but also on how theatricality and performance, as conceptual models, offer productive ways to think and understand the modern state and its apparatuses. We encourage a wide array of theoretical and empirical approaches to this subject and invite varied disciplinary modes including history and historiography, labour studies, geography, political economy, philosophy, literary and cultural theory and theatre and performance studies.

Suggested topics can include:

  • The state as censor / the state as defender of freedom of speech
  • The state’s active role in the development and regulation of theatre institutions and organizations
  • The state’s performance of itself (as military, as territory, as police, as justice, as ruler)
  • Theatre and sovereignty
  • Gendered, racialized, and other forms of state violence
  • Statelessness and its performances
  • The dialectic of nation and state
  • The performative desire for a state in histories of decolonization
  • States’ instrumentalisation of reproductive labour
  • Riots, strikes and other modes of collective organizing against the state’s legitimacy
  • The borders of the modern state
  • Absolutism’s legacies/ Absolutism’s others

 

Confirmed keynote speaker Dr. Tony Fisher, title TBC

Tony Fisher is Reader in Theatre and Philosophy, at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, and its associate director of research. His monograph, Theatre and Governance in Britain, 1500-1900: Democracy, Disorder and the State was published in 2017 by Cambridge University Press. He is also co-editor (with Eve Katsouraki) of Performing Antagonism: Theatre, Performance and Radical Democracy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) which examines the theory of agonism in relation to political performance. He is currently co-editing two further volumes, Theatre, Performance, Foucault! with Kélina Gotman (Kings) for Manchester University Press; and – also with Eve Katsouraki – Beyond Failure: New Essays on the Cultural History of Failure in Theatre and Performance for Routledge. Tony has published essays on theatre, politics, and philosophy in a number of journals, including Performance Philosophy Journal, Cultural Critique, Performance Research, and Continental Philosophy Review.

The convenors welcome proposals for traditional papers of 20 minutes in length, practice research demonstrations, panels and performances . Please email all abstracts (no more than 300 words in length), an additional few sentences of biographical information and details of the audio-visual technology you will need to make your presentation to Faisal Hamadah (f.hamadah@qmul.ac.uk) or Caoimhe Mader-Mcguinness (c.madermcguinness@kingston.ac.uk). The deadline for the submission of proposals is Monday 30th April 2018.

 

https://theatricalityperformanceandthestate.wordpress.com/

Graduate Edd Hobbs independent producer invites you to Farah Saleh’s ‘Brexit means Brexit’

We were delighted to hear from BA & MA Drama graduate Edd Hobbs about Brexit Means Brexit a show he’s producing.

Here’s what Edd had to say:

I have been working as an independent producer since completing my BA and MA with QMUL Department of Drama, and I’m currently producing PS/Y’s Hysteria programme (ps-y.org).

I’m writing to invite you to the premiere of a new dance commission by UK-based Palestinian choreographer Farah Saleh, investigating the collective mental health of UK residents after the EU Referendum. The project has been developed in collaboration with chartered psychologist Victoria Tischler, Professor of Arts & Health and Head of Dementia Care Centre, University of West London.

The performance is taking place on Friday 23 March 2018 – 7:30pm, at Siobhan Davies Studios.

Full information can be found here

Tickets are normally £5 but we offering a further 25% discount for QMUL students. Before completing check out in Eventbrite please click ‘Enter Promotional Code’ and type the code ‘student’.

We would be delighted to see you there!

All best wishes,

Edd Hobbs

4 QMUL Staff and Alumni Artists to See at Steakhouse Festival 2018

We’re clearly biased but would love to see our students, staff and friends at Steakhouse Live 2018.

Steakhouse Festival of Live Art & Performance | 24 Feb | 3pm – 10pm @ Rich Mix + 25 Feb | Midday – 9pm @ Toynbee Studios

‘Ferocious feminism, dirty desire, queer culture and resistance: Steakhouse Live are pleased to announce the programme for their 2018 Festival, taking place at Rich Mix and Toynbee Studies on the 24th & 25th of February.

Steakhouse Live is one of the few DIY platforms for radical performance practices in the UK today. Back with a force, their 5th festival edition will feature 20 live performances from international and UK based artists with work that cuts across theatre, performance art, visual art, cabaret, dance and all that’s in between.

Performances include Queen Mary alumni Oozing Gloop, Edythe Woolley and current tutors Eirini Kartsaki and Daniel Oliver.’

 

1. Daniel Oliver / Chiperlatartaparty

Happening Now in the Future. Don’t eat the sausages.

2. Eirini Kartsaki / Ladder

Eirini will have sex with a ladder and give birth to plywood.

3. Oozing Gloop / The Gloopshow Episode 1

A 45 minute stream of consciousness: a love song and saga of a green gal, a scarlet lady and their boyfriend; the revolution.

 

4. Edythe Woolley / FISHY

This is a performance looking around plastic pollution in the ocean and the plastic pollution in our bodies.

See the full programme and book online here