Our very own Michèle Barrett works with David Lammy on Unremembered – Britain’s Forgotten War Heroes on Channel 4 on Sunday 10 November for Remembrance Day

Our very own Professor Michèle Barrett is the historical consultant on pioneering new documentary by David Lammy; to Unremembered – Britain’s Forgotten War Heroes.

Trailer

About the show

Politician David Lammy MP will learn about the Black African soldiers who gave their lives for Britain during the First World War.

To mark Remembrance Day 2019, Lammy will travel to Africa and see the mass burial sites for the untold heroes.

The hard-hitting documentary will also question the war graves commission for their decision to not individually memorialise countless Black African soldiers and porters.

Seeing the mass burials first-hand, Lammy considers the measures needed to be taken to give these soldiers the same dignity as the soldiers who were given gravestones regardless of background, rank or creed.

Call for Papers: Politics and Desire in a Decadent Age: 1860 to the Present

Politics and Desire in a Decadent Age: 1860 to the Present — a one-day symposium — Call for Proposals

Hosted by the Department of English and the Sexual Cultures Research Group

Queen Mary University of London

Friday 15 May 2020

Keynote Speaker: Dennis Denisoff (McFarlin Chair of English, University of Tulsa,

author of Aestheticism and Sexual Parody and Sexual Visuality from Literature to Film)

The symposium committee invites papers from a diverse range of disciplinary backgrounds, including literature, sexuality and gender studies, history, visual art, film, and environmental studies, that interpret any aspect of the symposium theme of ‘Politics and Desire in a Decadent Age’.

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Urban sexual communities or conflicts
  • The sexual imagination and colonial decadence
  • Sexual identity in mass consumerism
  • Desires and the environmental humanities
  • Trans politics
  • Feminist fantasies
  • Desires and the decadent movement
  • Science and medicine of decadence
  • Gendered and erotic ecologies
  • ·ultural rot
  • Intersections of race, indigeneity, and gender
  • Ignored, invisible, and secreted desires
  • Decadent occultures

Proposals of up to 250 words for 15-minutes papers (along with a 100-word biographical note) should be submitted by 1 February 2020 to Catherine Maxwell: c.h.maxwell@qmul.ac.uk.  

English and Drama Newsletter – November 2019

November is here and is packed with unmissable events including: Wasafiri’s 35th birthday events including:

Read on for more top events and news from English and Drama at QMUL.

STUDENT OF THE MONTH

Meet our student of the month Aishah Nekiwala (pictured above centre) who graduated this yearfrom BA English. Read Aishah’s story

Events

FEATURED – EVENTS AT DR JOHNSON’S HOUSE

Our very own Jerry Brotton (English Professor) has advised on London’s Theatre of the East a new exhibition by Dr Johnson’s House and The Arab British Centre. The accompanying events programme includes: London’s Theatre of The East: Artists in Conversation Thursday 14 November 7pm featuring our very own Jerry Brotton.Irene at Dr Johnson’s House: Thursday 21 November 7pm  featuring Pen Woods and our very own Drama students.

Read more about the events here

LISTINGS

Mojisola Adebayo presents STARS: A concept album for the stage
Thursday 7 November 2019, Homotopia – Liverpool

Told through one woman and a live DJ, with projected animation, STARS tells the story of a very… very old lady who goes into outer space… in search of her own orgasm. Isn’t that where all the orgasms go?A moving, sensitive yet funny, multi-sensory and transformative space odyssey to be made aesthetically accessible for all.

Also in the Homotopia Festival Split Britches: Retro(Per)Spective (with our very own Lois Weaver and Peggy Shaw) on 9 November and The Gloop Show by our graduate Oozing Gloop on Friday 8 November.

Reimagining Britain: Curating, Performing, Publishing, Reading
Friday 8 November 2019, QMUL
This one-day symposium will host a series of discussions about the current climate for artistic and cultural production in Britain. The four thematic strands are on English literature (in particular school and university curricula design), publishing, curating and performing.

An Island Full of Voices: Writing Britain Now – Wasafiri
Saturday 9 November 2019, British Library
Celebrate 35 years of Wasafiri the magazine of international contemporary writing with a day at British Library featuring writers including Bernadine Evaristo (2019 Booker Prize Winner) and Nikesh Shukla (The Good Immigrant editor and QMUL graduate).   

The Sexual Cultures Research Group at QMUL: Saleem Haddad
Tuesday 12 November 2019, ArtsTwo 3.20, QMUL

Saleem Haddad’s first novel, Guapa, published in 2016, was awarded a Stonewall Honour and won the 2017 Polari First Book Prize. His short stories have been published in a number of anthologies, including most recently in the Palestinian science fiction anthology “Palestine +100”. Haddad was also selected as one of the top 100 Global Thinkers of 2016 by Foreign Policy Magazine. His directorial debut, Marco, premiered in March 2019 and was nominated for the Iris Prize for Best British Short. He is currently based in Lisbon.Saleem will be in conversation with Nadia Atia (QMUL).

Stephanie Newell – Postcolonial Seminar with English PGRS – Public Lecture
Thursday 14 November 2019, 6-8pm, ArtsOne Lecture Theatre, QMUL

Stephanie Newell will present a public lecture called:’ ‘Dirty’ Films in Colonial West Africa: Audience Responses to Health Propaganda Movies, 1930s-1950s’.

East Side Story – Part of A Season of Bangla Drama
Saturday 16 November 2019, The Great Hall, QMUL

East meets west in this high octane dance-off with two titans from the dance world, IMD and Bolly Flex. This show fuses hip hop and Bollywood in four acts, The Greatest Bollywood Showman, The Real Avengers of the UK, The History of Hip Hop and Romeo and Juliet Remixed!

See the full Season of Bangla Drama Programme

SHATTERING THE GLASS CEILING
Wednesday 20 November, Grand Hall, Battersea Arts Centre

Exclusive tickets for QMUL students and friends, email: rsvp@bac.org.uk

We are Queens. And we don’t need you to crown us.’ Getting to the roots of intersections of race, class and gender and how they impact careers, for womxn in the media and creative industries. 

The Guardian, Queen Mary University of London, Battersea Arts Centre and Omnibus Theatre unite to bring the themes around race and exclusion brought to light in Nouveau Riché’s Queens of Sheba, into the world of work.From racism towards BAME+ people to the lack of role models in many high-profile industries, this debut collaboration aims to open up discussion around the issues and give you insight into the organisations who desperately need a more diverse workforce.

Show and Tell #10
Wednesday 27 November, 6-8pm, QMUL

Booking just opened!

The 10th edition includes some top guest speakers giving inspiring mini talks. Line up includes Neil Connolly (The Crystal Maze Experience), Nafisa Bakkar (Amaliah), Mzz Kimberley (Trans activist), Elliott Ajai-Ajagbe Daley (QMUL alumnus) and Moj Taylor (Comedian). Open to all.

Book your free ticket

Southall Black Sisters: Turning the Page
Saturday 30 November, QMUL

A literary conversation between two groups of BAME women – published writers responding creatively to the stories of the SBS support group.

English Postgraduate Research Seminar
14 and 28 November, QMUL

Join us for the next English Postgraduate research events from Stephanie Newell and Clare Barker.

Follow @QMEnglishPGRS on Twitter for booking links

BOOK AHEAD – DRAMA GRADUATE PERFORMANCES

Email us your event

News

Mojisola Adebayo (Drama lecturer) has been awarded a 33 month Fellowship at Potsdam University for ‘White Climate: Afriquia Theatre Literatures and Agri/cultural Practices’.

Shane Boyle (Drama lecturer) will present an event to celebrate Postdramatic Theatre and Form at the 20th anniversary symposium for Hans-Thies Lehmann’s Postdramatic Theatre. This symposium is called “Postdramatic Theatre Worldwide” on 22-23 November in Berlin at Akademie der Künste.Shane is also speaking at UC Berkeley at the conference “After Post-Marxism” on 13 December.

Bridget Escolme (Drama Professor) gave a talk ahead of the production of Funeral – The Tragedy of Hamlet in the Faroe Islands.

Figs in Wigs’ Rachel Porter (Drama graduate) has written a piece for Exeunt magazine called The Ickiness of Marketing Your Art ahead of their show Little Wimmin at Pleasance Theatre.

Maggie Inchley (Drama)and Dr Sylvan Baker will lead The Verbatim Formula team working with its young people co-researchers to share young people’s experiences with MSPs in the Scottish Parliament.

Follow the project on Twitter @VerbatimFormula

Aoife Monks (Drama)has curated a free exhibition called Costume at the National Theatre, which is now open until 27 June 2020. She will be hosting The Secret Lives of Costume: A Multi-Sensory Walk as part of Being Human Festival on 23 November.

Bill Schwarz (English Professor) has written a piece for Soundings on ‘Humbug!’: Boris Johnson, Brexit and English populism.

Catherine Silverstone (Drama Reader) will speak at “Protest: Remembering Derek Jarman”, a seminar at IMMA (Irish Museum of Modern Art), which coincides with the opening of the exhibition, Derek Jarman. The exhibition is a major retrospective of the work of acclaimed British artist and filmmaker Derek Jarman (1942-1994), marking 25 years since his death. This is the first time that the diverse strands of his practice will be brought together in over 20 years.

Barbara Taylor (English and History Professor) appeared at Mental Health and the Georgian World: The ‘Madness’ of George III on 5 November.
Lois Weaver (Drama Professor) has received a Centre for Public Engagement large grant for ‘Embodied Imagination: An Interactive Workshop for Stroke Survivors’. The project is a collaboration with Prof. Pat Healy (EECS) and Rosella Galindo (EECS) and together they will develop a series of interactive workshops for Stroke Support groups around England in partnership with the Stroke Association.  Follow us on InstagramWhilst we try our hardest to make sure listings are accurate we recommend contacting the event organiser or registering before attending as mistakes can be made and we apologise for these.

If you have any news or events for next month please reply to this email.

Student of the month: Aishah Ahmed Nekiwala – BA (Hons) English

We caught up with Aishah to discuss her time at Queen Mary studying English. And here’s what she thought…

I will always stay strong even when I am on the verge of giving up. I live by what Shakespeare once said: ‘The worlds mine oyster, which I with sword will open.’.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

QMUL has been one rollercoaster ride.. and I literally mean a ROLLERCOASTER but definitely with more ups than downs! Despite extenuating circumstances, there were so many systems in place at the university which were so supportive and helpful. The English course at QMUL is so versatile. Whenever people ask me what I study and I respond with ‘English’ they all think its books and poetry. But the course at QM has taught me much more than this. I have learnt about Renaissance Literature and therefore the history of Seventeenth and Eighteenth century, I have studied some of the major philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle and Marx and I have even been given the opportunity to write my own short story receiving feedback from a professional author. Thus, the course expands beyond the field of literature into many other disciplines within the humanities and even beyond. The highlights of my degree has definitely got to be the creative projects I have carried out.

From visiting the Globe Theatre in Year one where we were given a tour from some of the greatest actors to organising my own field trip in Year two across London and thereafter producing my own walking journal. I was also given the chance to visit the famous home of Samuel Coleridge where I learnt so much about the challenges professional writers have faced in the past and finally, I was given the opportunity to study entire modules on renowned individuals such as Virginia Woolf and Michel Foucault. I cannot forget to mention, one of the biggest highlights which was conducting and writing my own research project (dissertation) where we had the opportunity to write 10,000 words on something within the field of English which we felt passionate about. There are so many positive memories which I will take away from my time at QM each and every one which would not have been possible without the support of the amazing seminar leaders, lecturers and the staff in the School of English and Drama.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

Studying BA English at QM has enabled me to develop several skills such as communication skills from participating in discussions and working in group projects, understanding concepts and theories by studying modules such as Reading Theory and Interpretation, Architexts, Critical Aesthetics and Ancient Myth Modern Theory and independent working when writing assignments and producing my final research project. These skills I learnt I have been able to transfer to the outside world such as during my interview at Buckingham Palace and universities such as Kings College London both which I was successful at. I will now hopefully be studying for a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (English) at Kings College London in September 2019. Although, I will truly miss my time at QM I will definitely remain a part of its alumni.

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole? (societies/friends/community/values)

One of the best things about QM was that students always had the opportunity to have their say and the university was so responsive to these suggestions.

Throughout the three years I have seen so many changes all because the university would always respond to the suggestions students would give. From having a library which extended its hours to 24/7 and offered laptop loans to students to the installation of equipment like microwaves across campus. The university was always willing to listen and implement student feedback actively. I also enjoyed the several organisations that the university opened its doors to throughout the years from having PWC in the Library Square to organisations such as Teach First, we were always given the opportunity to mix with leading employers and organisations.

I still remember when Bill Gates was coming to Campus and the tickets sold out in less than 5 minutes. It was absolutely crazy and the environment at campus was bizarre! Last but not the least, another thing which is so great about QM is that the university is so diverse. I have made such amazing and sincere friends during my time at the university which I will definitely be keeping in touch with. The university also celebrated so many events and even raised money for so many charities and organisations. I have actively been part of the ISOC events which have welcomed so many scholars and held so many events that have given me a break during the assignment deadlines. At QM we commemorated the lives which were lost during the Christchurch Shootings and also raised money for Community Sport by running for fun. QMUL has always been so supportive and open to all faiths and communities.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

Outside of QM I have been busy trying to set up my own organisation to help those experiencing mental health issues. Again, QM has been helpful in that they have offered grants to help oversee students business proposals and help them set these up. During my spare time I have set up my own poetry collection whilst also setting aside some time to take part in charity projects and volunteering such as for my local community centre.

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

Wholeheartedly and honestly, I cannot think of any major improvements the university needs to make to enhance students experience. Perhaps more one to one support with personal advisors would be useful to see how students are getting along throughout the year and if further support is needed. Furthermore, one thing I would definitely like to see in the future is the university offering a greater range of postgraduate programmes so that students like myself can return to the university to complete their further studies!

This November discover the secret life of costume at the National Theatre with Aoife Monks as part of Being Human Festival

We’re excited to share news of a new multi-sensory walk at the National Theatre devised by our very own Aoife Monks.

About the event

Come along to ‘The Secret Lives of Costume’ and discover the profound ways in which clothing shapes the experience of our bodies and the world. This sensory walk backstage at the National Theatre invites audiences to pay attention to the senses we can use to engage with theatre costume, to the smell of sweat, the sensation of a corset, the weight and sound of armour or the taste of thread. Visitors are also invited to consider the meanings of theatre costume for the people who work with it. Building on recent scholarship on the histories of backstage work, this event draws on research by Dr Aoife Monks to investigate the multi-sensory aspects of costume work. The event draws attention to the people who construct, repair and wear costumes for a living at the National Theatre.

This walk will be repeated on Saturday 23 November between 15:00 and 16:15.

Due to the nature of this event if you have any questions about accessibility we recommend getting in touch directly with the organiser.

London’s Theatre of the East Exhibition and November Events at Dr Johnson’s House featuring our students, Jerry Brotton and Pen Woods

Our very own Jerry Brotton has been working with Dr Johnson’s House as they present a series of events including a round table discussion about the exhibition and a dramatic reading of Irene by our Drama students.

London’s Theatre of the East – Meet the Artists

Saturday 9 November from 2 – 5pm

Visit for free to see our upcoming exhibition, London’s Theatre of the East and get a chance to meet the artists whose work is on display at the House. Explore all four floors of Dr Johnson’s House and discuss with our artists their varying responses to the theme of London’s links to the Middle East and North Africa over the past 500 years. You can read more about our exhibition here.

There’s no need to book, just turn up on the day!

Ottoman Empire map end of section: Roundtable Discussion

Thursday 14 November 7pm (Doors open at 6.30pm)

Join us for a roundtable discussion between the artists featured in our upcoming exhibition, London’s Theatre of the East, organised in collaboration with The Arab British Centre. Playwright Hannah Khalil, novelist Saeida Rouass, documentary photographer Lena Naassana and textile designer Nour Hage will join Dr Jerry Brotton, author of This Orient Isle, and the Donald Hyde Curator of Dr Johnson’s House for a discussion on how each artist approached and responded to the theme of the historical connections of the Middle East and North Africa with London, via the lens of Dr Johnson’s 1749 play, Irene, set during the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

Tickets £12 – includes a complimentary glass of wine

London’s Theatre of the East – Late night opening

Tuesday 19 November 6pm – 8pm (last entry at 7.30pm)

A rare opportunity to explore the Dr Johnson’s House at twilight and see all four floors of the museum, plus our upcoming exhibition for free.

You’ll also have a chance to meet the artists featured in London’s Theatre of the East in an informal setting and to discuss their exhibits with them, which are their responses to Johnson’s 1749 play Irene and their research into the connections between the Middle East, North Africa and London.

There’s no need to book, just turn up on the night!

Irene at Dr Johnson’s House

Thursday 21 November 7pm (Doors open at 6.30)

When Irene premiered at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane in February 1749 it ran for a respectable but underwhelming nine nights. Johnson regarded it as a failure, as did James Boswell, who claimed his friend ‘had not the faculty of producing the impressions of tragedy’. But the time has come to revisit Johnson’s neglected play – join us in the home he was living in while Irene was originally staged for the first public performance of Johnson’s play in 270 years!

This dramatic reading of Irene will be performed by the students from the English and Drama department of Queen Mary University London, under the direction of Dr Penelope Woods, Lecturer in Drama, with the advice of Professor Lois Potter, author of The Life of William Shakespeare, A Critical Biography,and Professor Emerita, University of Delaware.

Tickets £12 – includes a complimentary glass of wine

Unmissable English and Drama events in Semester 1 19/20

We have ground-breaking events galore in our first semester of the 2019/20 year. Please do join us for collaborations with Southall Black Sisters, The Guardian and many more in-house events.

Don’t forget to follow our research seminars English Postgraduate Research Seminar, QUORUM Drama Seminar and Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies for more events.

Monday 21 October

PANEL DISCUSSION: The Postcolonial Novel of Ideas


Jeanne-Marie Jackson-Awotwi (Johns Hopkins) & Rashmi Varma (Warwick)
Chair: Andrew van der Vlies (QMUL) present a panel discussion on ‘The Postcolonial Novel of Ideas’.

See more events in this series


Wednesday 23 October

Shattering the Glass Ceiling

Come and hear from leading Guardian journalists about the intersections of race, class and gender and how they impact careers in the media.


Thursday 31 October

Halloween Party with Daniel Oliver – BOOK Launch and Lo-fi Relaxed Rong Table Discussion

The event will include: discounted copies of the book, a chance to discuss its core topics (neurodiversity, awkwardness, audience participation) using Daniel’s clunkily conceived Rong Table format and due to the date, fully non-commital/over-committed Halloween dress code will be optional.


Friday 8 November

Reimagining Britain: Curating, Performing, Publishing, Reading

This one-day symposium will host a series of discussions about the current climate for artistic and cultural production in Britain. The four thematic strands are on English literature (in particular school and university curricula design), publishing, curating and performing. The event brings together experts and practitioners who will share their experience of how these areas of the arts may or may not be changing, especially given ongoing agendas around inclusivity, diversity and ‘decolonising’.

Speakers include: Aditi Anand, Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff, Natasha Bucknor, Elizabeth Cooper, Corinne Fowler, Rachael Gilmour, Nadia Yahya Hafedh, Anthony Joseph, Danuta Kean, Madhu Krishnan, Sharmaine Lovegrove, Malachi McIntosh, Rachael Minott and Jeremy Poynting.

Discover more events in the Wasafiri 35 series here


Tuesday 12 November

The Sexual Cultures Research Group at QMUL: Saleem Haddad

Saleem Haddad was born in Kuwait City to an Iraqi-German mother and a Palestinian-Lebanese father. His first novel, Guapa, published in 2016, was awarded a Stonewall Honour and won the 2017 Polari First Book Prize. His short stories have been published in a number of anthologies, including most recently in the Palestinian science fiction anthology “Palestine +100”. Haddad was also selected as one of the top 100 Global Thinkers of 2016 by Foreign Policy Magazine. His directorial debut, Marco, premiered in March 2019 and was nominated for the Iris Prize for Best British Short. He is currently based in Lisbon.

Saleem will be in conversation with Nadia Atia (QMUL). There will be an opportunity to buy copies of Guapa, which Saleem is happy to sign on the day.

Tickets are free, but booking is essential.


Saturday 16 November

East Side Story

East meets west in this high octane dance-off with two titans from the dance world, IMD and Bolly Flex. This show fuses hip hop and Bollywood in four acts, The Greatest Bollywood Showman, The Real Avengers of the UK, The History of Hip Hop and Romeo and Juliet Remixed! Check out glittering examples of cinema’s great dance moves with breath-taking agility and dynamism at Queen Mary’s Great Hall. These tributes and stories use acrobatics and physical theatre and provide the perfect homecoming for both IMD’s Omar Ansah-Awuah and Bolly Flex’s Naz Choudhury to return to their east London roots. Special guest appearances will help ignite this energetic dance spectacular as a reminder that commonalities and differences between cultures can be celebrated in the most exhilarating ways!


Saturday 30 November

Turning the Page: Book Launch with Southall Black Sisters

A literary conversation between two groups of BAME women – published writers responding creatively to the stories of the SBS support group.

Launching an anthology of writings, Turning the Page, by the SBS Survivors’ Group

Southall Black Sisters ends its 40th anniversary year with a unique evening, crowning a year- long series of events to celebrate its survival and reflect on its history. The anthology represents an intimate engagement, a two-way literary conversation, between established writers and emotionally vulnerable women who have found relief in writing about their troubled lives.

The survivors’ group at Southall Black Sisters have spent six months writing their stories in the company of Rahila Gupta.

Jackie Kay, Moniza Alvi, Meena Kandasamy, Miss Yankey and Rahila Gupta have written new work in response to the stories written by the SBS women. Their new work will be published in the book and they will read from this and other work alongside the SBS women. Imtiaz Dharker will also be performing at this event.

Be uplifted! Break your hearts and recommit yourself to the cause during the 16 days of activism against violence against women.

Did we miss any events? Leave a comment below…

English and Drama Newsletter – October 2019

Welcome to October. We have some incredible events and news to share with you so please read on…

Picture: Meet our student of the month Şenay Camgöz from MA Live Art

Read Şenay’s post

Events

OCTOBER OPEN DAY

Undergraduate Open Day
Saturday 5 October 2019, 10am-3.30pm

From Werewolves to live art, taster sessions at our open day are a great chance to explore English and Drama at QMUL.

Book online

FEATURED

A Season of Bangla Drama
November 2019, Various venues in Tower Hamlets including QMUL

A Season of Bangla Drama is back in Tower Hamlets for another month-long festival of British-Bengali theatre. It is now in its 17th year and firmly established in the area’s cultural calendar and includes a magnificent performance of East Side Story in our very own Great Hall in The People’s Palace.

Download the Season brochure

LISTINGS

New Suns: A Feminist Literary Festival
Saturday 5 October 2019, Barbican

Nisha Ramayya is reading and speaking at New Suns which explores new and continuing debates in feminist approaches to technology. She will also be reading and speaking at: Exploring Poetry as Disruption (Sat 19 Oct – Southbank Centre)  States of the Body Produced by Love (Fri 25 Oct – ICA)

Solitude, Sociability and Insanity in the Nineteenth Century
Tuesday 8 October 2019, ArtsTwo 3.20, QMUL

In the first paper in our 2019/20 seminar series, Mark Lee from the University of Oxford explores devotional solitude through the lens of ‘religious insanity’ in the nineteenth century.

Philosophy as Therapy
Wednesday 9 October 2019, LSE

Our very own Molly Macdonald is on the panel for to discuss whether thinking philosophically can be a form of self-help.

Writing Our Way Home
Tuesday 15 October 2019, Free Word EC1

What role can literature play in combatting hostile environments? In a new and exciting collaboration between Wasafiri and London’s Free Word Centre, Roger Robinson, Winsome Pinnock, Inua Ellams and Bridget Minamore join forces for readings and debate on writing and resistance. 

Find out more

QUORUM Drama Research Seminar: Molly McPhee
Wednesday 16 October 2019, QMUL

Be sure to go to the next QUORUM entitled ‘Miasmatic Performance: Carceral Atmospherics in the Theatre of Clean Break’. Photo: Pests by Vivienne Franzmann. Photo by Jonathan Keenan.

English Postgraduate Research Seminar
17 and 31 October, QMUL

Join us for the next English Postgraduate research events from Patrick Flanery and Kirsty Rolfe.

Follow @QMEnglishPGRS on Twitter for booking links

Doing Dr Duckie’s Homemade Mutant Hope Machines
Tuesday 22 October 2019, Attenborough Centre, University of Sussex

Drama PhD Ben Walters unpacks the world-making approaches to performance, cabaret, culture and care for so-called ‘marginalised’ communities.

Book here

Children Behind Bars

Thursday 24 October 2019, 2.07, Bancroft Building, QMUL

Matthew Ingleby will be giving a paper entitled ‘The Child through the Railings’ at this event.

Matthew will also be hosting a free Children’s Bloomsbury Walking Tour as part of Bloomsbury Festival on 20 October.

The Occult
Wednesday 30 October 2019, LSE, WC2A

How does philosophy contend with the mysterious and the inexplicable? Can it really be logic all the way down, or might rationality stand on something a little spookier? Our very own Nisha Ramayya is on hand to discuss at the Forum for Philosophy.

WEAVE IT! – Exhibition
30 October – 6 November 2019, Stour Space

Decorating Dissidence, run by our very own Jade French and alumni Dr. Lottie Whalen, invite you to ‘WEAVE IT!’ an exhibition celebrating and challenging 100 years of the Bauhaus women’s weaving workshop.   This exhibition considers the legacies of crafting and weaving from modernism to the contemporary, exhibiting textile practitioners who respond in different ways to the Bauhaus and beyond.

The launch night on 1st November will see performances by Rasia Kabir and SED’s Julie Rose Bower, with DJs and drinks. 
ONGOING


Read the Room – Contemporary Poetry Reading Group
Every Wednesday (12-1pm) in the Yurt, St Benet’s Chaplaincy, QMUL

Join Read the Room every Wednesday (beginning 9 October) to gather together and fill the room with poetry. Each week we will read aloud work by a different poet or on a different theme, appreciating the culture of contemporary poetry and a collaborative environment.

Meet other poetry enthusiasts or casual readers, stay on top of poetry events, or just enjoy reading something new. Drop in or just come when you can, Read the Room aims to be an accessible space to have fun with poetry.

Sign up for updates

BOOK AHEAD

Frauke Requardt & Daniel Oliver
Dadderrs

5-6 November 2019, The Place

Daniel is dyspraxic and is too slow.
Frauke has ADHD and is too quick.
They are married and have kids.

Join the couple in the Meadowdrome, their fantastical escapist world. Together you will encounter awkwardly intimate interactive actions, strange dances, sweet and surreal songs, and other off-kilter “grown-up” activities.

This interactive show invites you to explore, converse and play within the neurodivergent realm Daniel and Frauke have created.

Find out more

Turning the Page
Saturday 30 November 2019, QMUL

Launching an anthology of writings, Turning the Page, by the SBS Survivors’ Group: A literary conversation between two groups of BAME women – published writers responding creatively to the stories of the SBS support group.

Email us your event

News

Mojisola Adebayo will be presenting The Interrogation of Sandra Bland at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in October, culminating in a performance by a huge chorus of black / women-of-colour on stage.

Pragya Dhital joined the English department in September as a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, with a project on proscribed political pamphlets in colonial India. During the summer she had two articles published: “From ‘Imam ul-Hind’ to Azizul Hind: The ‘One Man Media House’ in Modern India”, South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, 42:3, 452-468, DOI: 10.1080/00856401.2019.1596778 “Media satyagraha in the broadcast age: underground literature and populist politics during the Indian internal emergency of 1975–1977”, Interventions: Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 21: 7, 942-958, DOI: 10.1080/1369801X.2019.1585908

Michael Hughes (Creative Writing Lecturer)’s book is reviewed by The New York Times: ‘Hughes’s story proceeds at a breakneck cinematic pace, full of booby traps, double agents and arias promising gruesome revenge.’ Read the full review here

Eleni Sophia (aka English student Sophia Hussain) has published her third book ‘This One’s For You’. The poetry collection is about encouraging young women about the importance of self-love and provides words of encouragement for those going through a tough time.

In July, both Khloe and Kourtney Kardashian shared her poem ‘Her Mindset’ from my first poetry book, ‘Good Morning to Goodnight’ on their Snapchat and Instagram stories.

Hari Marini (Research Student Support) has published her poetry collection 28 ΔΙΑΔΡΟΜΕΣ ΤΗΣ | 28 PATHS OF HER. It has been reviewed here.

Susheila Nasta (English Professor) is has edited a collection called Brave New Words: The Power of Writing Now (Out 7 November) an anthology of essays by 15 world writers to celebrate 35 years of Wasafiri but also channels the hot political topics of today. It features work from Bernardine Evaristo, Tabish Khair, Blake Morrison, Mukoma wa Ngugi, Marina Warner and many more.

Pathologies of Solitude project has been awarded a ‘Diversity and Inclusion’ grant by the Wellcome Trust (£21,192) for a project addressing solitude and loneliness as aspects of migrant and refugee experience.

The 18-month project is led by Akshi Singh, postdoctoral fellow on the ‘Pathologies of Solitude’ project, and Nisha Ramayya ( Creative Writing Lecturer at QMUL), and is partnered by Akwaaba, an anti-racist migrant befriending centre in East London.

The project will support six creative arts workshops to be held at
Akwaaba, facilitated by BME writers and other diverse artists. Its
results will be disseminated through zines made with workshop
participants, an exhibition and a public story-telling event.

People Palace Projects’Xingu Encounter has been nominated for a Times Higher Education award for ‘International Collaboration of the Year’. The project explores new ways to work with indigenous people in Brazil to preserve & protect their knowledge & culture.

Mahima Tyagi (English with Creative Writing student) has taken over the School of English and Drama Instagram.

Follow us for news and views from Mahima and our students

Ellen Wiles (English Teaching Fellow) curated and spoke at Asylum Stories: Fact, Fiction, Truth event at British Library.

Follow us on Instagram

Whilst we try our hardest to make sure listings are accurate we recommend contacting the event organiser or registering before attending as mistakes can be made and we apologise for these.

Student of the month: Şenay Camgöz – MA Live Art

Şenay Camgöz (MA Live Art) tells us about her work and highlights at QMUL…

www.senaycamgoz.co.uk

I am an artist and filmmaker developing my creative practice.

Tell us about your time at QMUL. What have been your highlights?

The highlight was a screening of my short film, ‘Introducing HALA’ at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late event in April 2019.

How has your course at Queen Mary helped you to progress into the world outside? What’s next?

I am half way through my MA in Live Art and have already had the chance to share my work with a wider public. The practical support I have received at Queen Mary University has helped me to promote my work on social media networks. Through QMUL I had the chance to screen my work at a major national museum which has given me the confidence to seek opportunities to share my work more widely.

Aside from course content what have been your favourite elements of the experience of studying here as a whole? (societies/friends/community/values)

Practical workshops have been very useful, in particular, the DIY Life Skills workshop on using Photoshop.

Tell us about your life outside Queen Mary including any projects, ambitions or jobs you’ve had.

The essay writing I have been doing as part of my MA has inspired me to write more and I am currently taking part in a collaborative writing project with other arts and humanities students.

What could be improved to enhance future students’ experience at Queen Mary?

More practical workshops on how to approach institutions with a view to sharing work and advice on writing applications for residencies.

Thirty-one books for Black History Month – a random and non-exhaustive list from Dr Rachael Gilmour, Head of English

To celebrate Black History Month our very own Head of English Rachael Gilmour has chosen 31 books which should be on your reading list.

  1. CLR James, The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution (1938)
  2. Gwendolyn Brooks, Selected Poems (2006)
  3. Peter Fryer, Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain (1984)
  4. Christina Sharpe, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016)
  5. Grace Nichols, The Fat Black Woman’s Poems (1984)
  6. Nadifa Mohamed, The Orchard of Lost Souls (2013)
  7. Yrsa Daley-Ward, Bone (2017)
  8. Andrea Levy, Small Island (2004)
  9. Bernardine Evaristo, Mr Loverman (2014)
  10. Pauline Black, Black by Design: A 2-Tone Memoir (2012)
  11. James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (1963)
  12. Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me (2015)
  13. Saidiya Hartman, Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (2018)
  14. Diana Evans, Ordinary People (2018)
  15. Warsan Shire, Teaching My Mother How To Give Birth (2011)
  16. Akala, Natives (2018)
  17. Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené, Slay in Your Lane: The Black Girl Bible (2018)
  18. Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners (1954)
  19. Jackie Kay, The Adoption Papers (1991)
  20. David Dabydeen, John Gilmore and Cecily Jones, The Oxford Companion to Black British History (2015)
  21. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah (2013)
  22. Anthony Joseph, Kitch: A Fictional Biography of a Calypso Icon (2018)
  23. Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric (2014)
  24. Paul Gilroy, There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack: The Cultural Politics of Race and Nation (1987)
  25. Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing (2017)
  26. Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987)
  27. Audre Lorde, Your Silence Will Not Protect You: Essays and Poems (2017)
  28. Alex Wheatle, East of Acre Lane (2006)
  29. Aminatta Forna, The Memory of Love (2011)
  30. David Olusoga, Black and British: A Forgotten History (2016)
  31. Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race (2017)

Which book would you add to this list?

Meet our Teaching Associates and Teaching Fellows for 2019/20

We’ve just published staff profiles for our inspiring English and Drama Teaching Associates and Teaching Fellows who are working with our students this year.

Click the buttons below to get to know them better and find out about their specialisms.

Drama Graduate Eloina Haynes presents two new shows: FISH DON’T BLEED and PORN FLAKES

“I’m Eloina Haines, I graduated from Drama at QM last year and I am now a performance artist/clown in London.

On 30 September, I am performing my solo show FISH DON’T BLEED and a scratch of a new performance I am making with another QM alumni, Emily Redpath, called Porn Flakes.

Here’s some information about the shows…

Step into a feminist world of grotesque celebration and throw a middle finger up to any ‘lady’ taboos.Queen Mary alumni, performance artist and clown, ELOINA, is at Camden People’s Theatre on 30th September with TWO NEW SHOWS.

Tickets available here: Big Bang | Camden People’s Theatre

FISH DON’T BLEED (created and performed by Eloina Haines, directed by alumni Brontë Kazim) and Porn Flakes (created and performed by alumni Eloina Haines and Emily Redpath).

Returning Second and Third Year Information 2019/20

Here’s the key information you need for resuming your study with us.

Free pizza and soda lunch for SED students on Thursday 26 September 2019 from 1-2pm in ArtsOne foyer.

Student Timetables

You will be able to access a personalised timetable via the QMUL mobile app, or via the Central Web Timetables website. To access your timetable via the QMUL mobile app simply click on the ‘Timetable’ button; in Central Web Timetables website you will need to click on the ‘Students’ link on the left of the page, and enter your 9 digit Student ID, which can be found on your Student ID card. We are currently finalising seminar allocations, so your full timetable may not be visible until the end of Welcome Week. If you notice any discrepancies with your timetable please contact the Admin Team at sed-information@qmul.ac.uk.   

Advisors

You can see who your advisor is this Semester by clicking on the ‘Your Advisor(s)’ button on the SED Undergraduate Homepage, or via this link: http://qmplus.qmul.ac.uk/mod/url/view.php?id=623066

QMplus Module Areas and Module Outlines

QMplus Module Areas for Semester 1 and year-long modules will be released throughout Welcome Week. They will be released a week before the first teaching session of the module is due to take place (for instance, a module taught on Mondays will be released on Monday 16 September). Module Outlines are visible via the School of English and Drama – Module Documentation area. All module information should be visible on the Module Outlines, but if you can’t access anything please contact the Module Convenor, who will be listed on the ‘Module Profile’ page.

The Module Change Request Process

Students are able to submit module change requests via the online Module Change Request form (available here: https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=kfCdVhOw40CG7r2cueJYFJUMEAYawjhPpa2lNl_oE1VUNFcxWk1KRFhTNUFSTkc0UjNZNVhQM0VTUi4u). The form will close at 12pm on Friday 4 October. Each evening during this period an online spreadsheet indicating the current module availability will be updated. You will be able to find this via the Undergraduate Module Directory on QMplus, or by following this direct link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qLJDfapG0PQsxKUJvZ48Ezrz-qeTR47L0zNt7Mcb4fM/edit?usp=sharing.

While it’s important to note that this simply offers an indication of availability, we would strongly recommend that you consult this information before completing the form. Please note that you won’t be able to change your responses once they have been submitted, and once a module change request has been accepted no further requests will be considered. Module change requests can take up to a week to process fully, though the Admin Team aim to process them as fast as possible. You will be contacted to let you know whether your request is possible or not. 

The Admin team will not be able to process any module change requests submitted via email or over the phone, but if you experience any issues accessing the form, or have questions about your module choices, please do get in contact with us via sed-information@qmul.ac.uk.

Final-Year Students taking ESH6000 English Research Dissertation

There is a compulsory workshop for all students taking ESH6000 English Research Dissertation in the Drapers Lecture Theatre, Geography Building, on Friday 20 September, from 11am-12pm.

If you have any questions about the information included in this blog post please contact the Admin team at sed-information@qmul.ac.uk.       

And the Winner of our Tote Bag competition 2019 is…

THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO ENTERED THEIR QUOTATIONS AND DESIGNS. THE WINNER OF OUR TOTE BAG COMPETITION CHOSEN IN A VOTE BY SED STAFF 2019 IS…

NAJIYAH BEGUM (SECOND YEAR ENGLISH STUDENT)

Here’s some of the amazing entries we received and have turned into postcards and bookmarks! Quotes are on postcards too so keep an eye out in goodie bags and our reception area in welcome week.

Ali Campbell launches his new book: The Theatre of the Oppressed in Practice Today (Bloomsbury)

Ali Campbell launching his new book:

The Theatre of the Oppressed in Practice Today (Bloomsbury), which is an introduction to the work of his own teacher and mentor, the legendary Brazilian Director and founder of the Theatre of the Oppressed movement, Augusto Boal.

Seen here with one of Boal’s original Theatre Company Barbara Santos (holding Ali’s book). Ali in turn is holding her own which they are launching in parallel: Theatre of the Oppressed:  Roots and Wings (Kuringa).  The launch took the form of seminars and workshops in Rio de Janeiro at the headquarters of CTO Rio, Boal’s original company, alongside the devising of street theatre pieces and other interventions across the City protesting the draconian measures currently being proposed by the Bolsanaro Administration and impacting heavily on access to State funded Higher Education.

A similar event will happen as part of this year’s Season of Bangla Drama Festival, of which Ali is a co-Director with responsibility for CPD across the Festival’s 17 theatre companies and 6 venues, of which QMUL is one. The Festival begins on Friday 1st November.