2019 Year and Semester Abroad Opportunities with English and Drama

A year abroad can really open up new opportunities and give you valuable life experience to take into your future career. 

According to the UK Universities International Report (March 2017):

  • Graduates who were mobile during their degree were less likely to be unemployed (3.7% compared to 4.9%), and more likely to have earned a first class or upper second class degree (80.1% compared to 73.6%) and be in further study (15% compared to 14%).
  • Those in work were more likely to be in a graduate level job (76.4% compared to 69.9%) and earn 5% more than their non-mobile peers.

The study abroad experience is intense, and because of this special quality and the quality of emotional investment in this period students are likely to make particularly strong friendships and have particularly memorable experiences. There are all sorts of opportunities that students will find access to because of location or circumstance that they wouldn’t necessarily get in London- one former student was offered a role in a professional production in New York, students on exchange with Howard University have inbuilt work experience and opportunities on Capitol Hill with the US government, students in New York might seek out opportunities with the UN.

We’re delighted to announce that as from 2018 the following undergraduate BA (Hons) degrees can include a year abroad:

Our Current Year Abroad Partners

  1. Columbia University, New York, USA
  2. University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  3. University of Miami, Florida, USA
  4. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
  5. University of Melbourne, Australia
  6. The University of Toronto, Canada
  7. The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  8. The University of Monash– Melbourne, Australia Semester 1 and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Semester 2

Semester Abroad

Please note we are still offering our Semester Abroad in the second year of all of our courses with the following institutions:

Columbia University, New York; Howard University, Washington DC; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; The George Washington University, Washington DC; University of Miami, FL; University of Richmond, VA; The University of Texas at Austin; University of Melbourne; University of Sydney; The University of Toronto; University of Ottawa, Canada; The University of Auckland, NZ; University of Hong Kong; Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Seoul National University; Waseda University, Tokyo; Renmin University, Beijing.

New opportunities for semester abroad and/or year abroad are being developed at universities in Europe, North America, New Zealand and elsewhere. These will be offered as they become available.

Advice and Guidance

If you would like any advice on Study Abroad opportunities within the School of English and Drama please contact:

Visit the QMUL Global Opportunities website for more information

Please note study abroad is subject to availability, application and the host University’s own terms and conditions.

Len Lukowski, Deirdre Shanahan and Daniella Shokoohi win the Wasafiri New Writing Prize 2018

The 2018 Wasafiri New Writing Prize winners are announced with winners in the following categories:

Fiction: ‘Plunder’ by Deirdre Shanahan;

Poetry: ‘In the Garden Where the Gorgons Live’ by Daniella Shokoohi;

Life Writing: ‘Diary of a Teenage Boy’ by Len Lukowski.

Picture caption: Back row L-R: Prize judges Kerry Young, Susheila Nasta, and Elleke Boehmer / Front row L-R: Winners Deirdre Shanahan and Len Lukowski, and prize judge Malika Booker / Photography by Ingrid Guyon

The three winners will be published in print by Wasafiri and receive a cash prize. They will also be offered the Chapter and Verse or Free Reads mentoring scheme in partnership with The Literary Consultancy, dependent on eligibility.

The judges of this year’s prize are Kerry Young (Fiction), Malika Booker (Poetry) and Elleke Boehmer (Life Writing). Each entry was judged blind and the winners for each category were decided by all three judges and the founding editor of Wasafiri and Chair of Judges, Susheila Nasta. Speaking on the prize this year, Susheila Nasta said, ‘representing fresh perspectives from around the world, this year’s entries were both innovative and ambitious, passionately engaging with subjects that are key to contemporary life and the conflicts of our times.’

The winning Poetry entry ‘is a mesmerizing poem that renders a beauty even while describing pain. From the first line you’re caught and taken on a journey. It’s a strong lyrical poem, but also experimenting and pushing,’ as described by judge Malika Booker.

Kerry Young said of the winning Fiction entry, “‘Plunder’ was original and fluently written with meticulous observation. It was engaging and poignant.”

On judging the winning Life Writing entry, Elleke Boehmer said, ‘The judges were impressed at the sensitivity and economy of this story. In particular, they commended how the story took us into the central character’s world and perspective, and shared its dilemmas over fallible memory and shifting identity in fresh, illuminating ways.’

This year’s prize event took place at The Blenheim Saloon within Marlborough House, with thanks to Routledge, Queen Mary University of London, Arts Council England and Commonwealth Writers, the cultural initiative of the Commonwealth Foundation. Testimonies from last year’s winners Julie Abrams-Humphries and Mehran Waheed about the impact of Wasafiri’s New Writing Prize on their careers were played to the audience, before each judge announced the winning entry in their category.

 

About the prize

Now in its ninth year, the Wasafiri New Writing Prize was launched to support new writers, with no limits on age, gender, nationality or background. With a list of high profile judges over the years including Brian Chikwava, Colin Grant, Maya Jaggi, Jackie Kay, Tabish Khair, Toby Litt and Blake Morrison, the Wasafiri New Writing Prize has boosted the confidence of writers in competitive times. The 2018 prize attracted entries from nearly one third of the countries in the world, with entries from a total of sixty countries.

About the Magazine: WASAFIRI – The Journal of International Contemporary Writing

Wasafiri is the UK’s leading magazine for international contemporary writing. Launched in 1984 by Susheila Nasta OBE, it is renowned for publishing some of the world’s most distinguished writers including Chinua Achebe, Kamau Brathwaite, Anita and Kiran Desai, Sam Selvon, Nadine Gordimer, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Michael Ondaatje, Vikram Seth, Nayantara Sahgal, Gillian Slovo and Ben Okri amongst many others. One of its inaugural, and continuous visions is to provide much needed literary and critical coverage of writers from BAME backgrounds who often struggle to get adequate attention in the mainstream. The magazine played a pioneering role in reviewing the first novels and early poetry of writers who are now well-known, challenging the predominant assumption that their work would only be of ‘minority interest’.

 

 

Serena Ceniccola MA Victorian Literature presents her paper at University of Freiburg

Serena Ceniccola (furthest right in picture above) – graduand with an MA in Victorian Literature from the School of English and Drama- successfully presented her paper “Nobody/Nowhere: the alienation of the Hybrid in Sui Ishida’s Tokyo Ghoul” at the two-day student conference “Exploring alterity in fantasy and science fiction” at the University of Freiburg, making QMUL the only one London based University to take part in the event.

The paper explores the relationship between hybridity and memory in the context of horror manga, which – in its contemporary form – has been heavily influenced by British Victorian Press and 19th century Gothic. Serena – who already earned an MA in Modern, Post-colonial and Comparative literature with Distinction (summa cum laude) from University of Bologna specializing in Japanese, Finnish and Anglo-American studies – is especially interested in the fields of identity, hybridity, and cultural contacts. According to her paper: “Exploring new representations of the Hybrid in fiction is very important if we want to really understand the world we live in today.”

The conference – that took place on October 19th and 20th – saw nineteen MA students and PhD candidates from different countries and with very different backgrounds discussing how otherness manifests in speculative fiction. Their works focused on novels, comics, podcasts, movies, manga, and videogames.

Dr Timothy Baker (lecturer in Scottish and contemporary literature at University of Aberdeen) gave one of the two key lectures scheduled on “The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl vs The Capitalocene.” Dr Helena Ifill (University Teacher at University of Sheffield, co-organizer for the Victorian Popular Fiction Association and co-director for the University of Sheffield Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies) discussed the effects of mesmerism on the self with her lecture “Othering the Self: Speculative Psychological Fiction”.

Head of Drama Caoimhe McAvinchey in conversation with Lucy Perman (former CEO at Clean Break) on 30 October 2018

Lucy Perman, former Chief Executive of Clean Break and Caoimhe McAvinchey, Head of Drama, Queen Mary University of London

Lucy Perman MBE will be in conversation with Dr Caoimhe McAvinchey discussing her role leading Clean Break over two decades.

Lucy was the Chief Executive of Clean Break from 1997 to 2018. In 2017 she won a Lifetime Achievement Award for work in criminal justice and she was also named in the Evening Standard’s Progress 1000 list. She has held a number of roles across the arts and cultural sector and received her MBE for services to drama in 2005. She is a trustee of the Almeida Theatre.

Caoimhe McAvinchey is Reader in Socially Engaged and Contemporary Theatre at Queen Mary University of London. Prior to this she established the MA Applied Drama: Theatre in Educational, Community and Social Contexts at Goldsmiths. Her publications include Theatre & Prison (2011), Performance and Community: Case Studies and Commentary (2013), Phakama: Making Participatory Theatre (2018) with Fabio Santos and Lucy Richardson, and Applied Theatre: Women and the Criminal Justice System (forthcoming, 2018).

Caoimhe is currently collaborating with Clean Break theatre company on a book about the company’s four decades of innovative and radical theatre practice with and about women affected by the criminal justice system.

A Season of Bangla Drama at Queen Mary announced

November 2018 marks the sixth year of Queen Mary University of London Drama’s strategic partnership with Europe’s largest festival of Bengali culture.

Selected from November’s events across six Tower Hamlets venues, we cordially invite you to a programme curated by Ruksana Begum (Tower Hamlets Arts) and Ali Campbell (QMUL Drama).

Seminar: True News and Fake News hosted by the London Bengali Press Club

In an international climate actively hostile to professional journalists, how are we to discern the truth in troubled times?

Tuesday 6th November. Pinter Studio. 7.30 (Doors open 7.00). Free.

Book online

Talk: The Kingdom of Arakan by Restless Beings

This leading international charity invites you to a panel discussion with academics, activists and Rohingya community leaders, plus spoken word pieces and a short film about the genocide in Myanmar.

Wednesday 7th November. Pinter Studio. 7.30 PM. (Doors open 7.00).

Book online

HITM4N Inc by The Filim Company

H1TM4N Inc. Trailer from Filim on Vimeo.

A dark workplace comedy, set against the backdrop of an assassination agency. Office politics can be deadly!

Thursday 8; Friday 9; Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 November. Pinter Studio. 7.30 PM. (Doors open 7.00). £10.00/£8.00. In English.

Book online

Apply Now for Studentships from LISS & LAHP

4 amazing opportunities to apply for further study…

London Interdisciplinary Social Science ESRC Doctoral Training Partnership (LISS DTP)

LISS Open Studentship Competition:  this is our competition where we accept proposals directly from prospective students, for either a 1+3 award (1 year Masters + 3 year PhD) or +3 award (PhD only).  You can find detailed information about eligibility criteria and the application process on the following two webpages:

Key frequently-asked points to highlight:

  • The application deadline is 31 January 2019, 17:00 GMT for studentships to start 1 October 2019.  Applicants should be encouraged to read the above webpages carefully to ensure all necessary application materials reach us by that date.
  • We are still able to accept applications from EU residents for this year and wherever possible we will ‘top-up’ the award to pay a stipend to high-calibre EU students from institutional contributions to the LISS grant (since the ESRC only covers fees for EU residents).
  • Proposed research must be at least 50% social science (but can have a strong interdisciplinary component) and must fall within the remit of at least 1 of our 13 Thematic Pathways

LISS Collaborative (CASE) Studentship Competition

this competition initially seeks proposals from academics based in one of our three partner institutions for 1+3 or +3 format studentship research projects which involve significant collaboration with a non-HEI partner, in the public, private or third sectors.

Full details about submitting a proposal (as an academic) are available here: https://liss-dtp.ac.uk/studentships/collaborative-case-studentships/  The deadline for proposals for studentships to start 1 October 2019 is 12 November 2018, 23:59 GMT.  To see details of currently-funded CASE studentships, please see this webpage: https://liss-dtp.ac.uk/case-studentships-student-applicants/

  • We welcome proposals where a proposed student to be awarded the project is already named, but this is not necessary and it does not reflect negatively on a proposal not to have a named student.  Academic winners of the proposal stage will be informed by the end of November 2018 and recruitment of a student can begin after this point.
  • A financial contribution from the non-HEI partner is encouraged but not required.  In any proposal, evidence of a strong, two-way plan of collaboration between the academic/student and non-HEI partner must be shown, along with in-kind benefits for the student such as: mentorship within the partner organisation, periods of time spent at the partner organisation, data sharing, access to specialised training through the partner etc.
  • Again, proposed research must be at least 50% social science (but can be strongly interdisciplinary) and must fall within the remit of at least 1 of our 13 Thematic Pathways.

LISS Postdoctoral Fellowships:  administration of the ESRC’s one-year postdoctoral fellowship scheme has now been devolved to LISS DTP.  Details about this scheme can be found here on the LISS website: https://liss-dtp.ac.uk/esrc-pdf/ . We do not have full details yet, but expect the timeline to be similar to last year, with the deadline for applications in mid-late March 2019 for fellowships to start in October 2019.

 

London Arts & Humanities Partnership AHRC (LAHP DTP)

London Arts & Humanities Partnership Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA) Scheme

The London Arts & Humanities Partnership (LAHP) is delighted to announce that its Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA) Scheme is open for proposals for studentship projects to commence in October 2019.

Collaborative Doctoral Awards (CDAs) provide funding for doctoral studentship projects, developed as a partnership between an HEI-based academic in collaboration with an organisation outside higher education. They are intended to encourage and develop collaboration and build partnerships.

CDA projects provide opportunities for doctoral students to gain first-hand experience of work outside the university environment and enhance the employment-related skills and training a research student gains during the course of their studies.

Those wishing to propose a CDA project to commence in the 2019/20 academic year can find full details of the scheme and download the LAHP DTP CDA Application Form on the LAHP website. The deadline for proposals from HEI academic staff/non-HEI partners for CDA studentship projects (commencing in the 2019/20 academic year) is Monday 3rd December 2018 at 09.00. Any queries should be directed to info.lahp@london.ac.uk

London Arts & Humanities Partnership Open Studentship Competition

The London Arts & Humanities Partnership (LAHP) open studentship competition for PhD applications in the arts and humanities to begin in October 2019 will open at the end of November.

Further details will be published on the LAHP website

English and Drama Events for Year 12-13 Students 2018/19

We have some eye-opening events coming up for those aged 16-18 including a Frankenstein themed Halloween event, a chance to hear from The Good Immigrant editor Nikesh Shukla, an expert discussion of The Handmaid’s Tale and a free A-Level revision day in early 2019.

Frankenreads x QMUL – Celebrate 200 Years and unlock the secrets of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Students are invited to a film screening, fancy dress lecture and Halloween Monster Mingle celebrating two hundred years of Mary Shelley’s gothic horror and feminist classic.

Wednesday 31 October 2018

17:00-21:00

ArtsTwo Ground Floor Foyer and Lecture Theatre

Free, book online: http://bit.ly/frankenreadsqmul

 

Queen Mary Writers/Wasafiri Live: Bidisha and Nikesh Shukla in conversation

Queen Mary, University of London and Wasafiri invite you to a reading and conversation with Nikesh Shukla and Bidisha. This is a chance to engage in lively discussion with some ground-breaking writers of the moment.

Tuesday 13 November 2018

18:30-20:30

The Chaplaincy, QMUL – Mile End

Free, book online: http://bit.ly/qmulwriters1

 

Is ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ really a feminist text?

Experts from our School of English and Drama come together to discuss Margaret Atwood’s famous dystopian novel. This panel discussion will explore the extent to which we can describe The Handmaid’s Tale as a feminist text.

It will challenge many opinions that readers hold regarding the novel, as well as placing it within the current political climate in the UK and USA. You will have the opportunity to question our experts, as well as having the chance to speak with undergraduates about what it is like to study literature at university level. This taster course is open to year 12 and 13 students. You must be studying English at A-level or SL/HL IB.

Wednesday

15:15-18:00

QMUL – Mile End

Free, book online: http://bit.ly/sedhandmaidstale

English and Drama A-Level Revision Day – Practical Help with A-Level Topics

Group sessions with top academics from Queen Mary will look at key A-level English and Drama texts and concepts to help with your revision.

Wednesday 20 February 2019

10:00-16:00

Rooms TBC, QMUL – Mile End

Free, book online: http://bit.ly/sedrevisionday2019

 

No-Nonsense Applicant Guide by Saarah Ahsan-Shah

Even after choosing a degree, deciding which university to do it at might seem daunting. It’s worth researching the nature of a particular degree at various universities to compare them. English at one university is not the same as English at another.

To start off your research, read on for answers to commonly asked questions about English and Drama at Queen Mary, first hand from two students; myself (an English student) and Chris Dhanjal, a joint honours English and Drama student.

Applying to Queen Mary

1. What are the entry requirements?

The entry requirements are typically ABB at A Level (or an equivalent qualification), with an A in English Literature / English Language and Literature. Non-standard qualifications are also sometimes accepted from well-motivated candidates who demonstrate achievement in literary study. See here for more details of our entry requirements.

2. Do you give unconditional offers?

We have just launched our Outstanding Potential Award for those who show a high potential. If you meet the criteria for the award we will contact you to arrange an interview. More details about applying are available here.

3. Can you combine English or Drama with another subject?

Yes! Students are able to take joint courses, and are able to take English alongside another subject such as Drama, Linguistics, Creative Writing, Film Studies and History.

Our degrees are all about giving you social capital, through work experience, modules from other schools and extra activities, so you have the skills to succeed in life in and outside of university. The QMUL Principal, Professor Colin Bailey talks about this new approach we are taking in this article in The Guardian.

Structure

1. What modules are offered in an English and/or Drama degree?

English: In first year we had  six compulsory modules; Reading, Theory and Interpretation, Poetry, Narrative, Shakespeare, Literatures in Time and English in Practice. These modules gave us a foundation in English Literature across the spectrum which becomes more specific in second year. In second year, there are three categories, ‘Medieval and Early-Modern Studies’, ‘Eighteenth-Century, Romanticism, Nineteenth-Century Studies’ and  ‘Modern, Contemporary, And Postcolonial Studies’.

We picked one module from each category and a fourth module either from one of these categories or from a “special list”, which offers a range of options. In our third year, we are given plenty more options, not bound by any categories, allowing us to pursue any field enabling us to take whatever piques our interest.  Third year modules include Postcolonial, American and Children’s literatures to name a few.

Drama: In first year, all students take London/Culture/ Performance, and Practices, which help negotiate Drama at university level. Joint honours students take six compulsory modules consisting of four Drama modules which are a combination of seminar and practical based ones and two English. For second year we were given more options, but again had to take one compulsory Drama module and at least two English modules from two separate areas.

In total we were allowed five modules but had to have an equal balance of credits across English and Drama. For final year, the options become a lot more flexible, with the choice of taking seventy-five credits in Drama and forty-five credits in English. Examples of second and third year Drama modules include Choreographic Performance, Shakespeare after Shakespeare and Race and Racism in Performance .

A current list of modules can be seen here, at the English and Drama Module Directory: https://qmplus.qmul.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=2960. This list of modules changes every year.

2. How many contact hours do you have a week?

English: We have 8-10 contact hours per week, depending on whether we take 4 or 5 modules per semester. Each module has 2 contact hours; typically a 1 hour lecture followed by a 1 hour seminar. Some modules in second year may not have a lecture and only a 2 hour seminar. In third year, most modules have a 2 hour seminar. Though 8 may seem a little, we’re expected to prepare for each module with 4 hours of work, through reading, research and assignment preparation.

Drama: We typically have 10 hours a week. In third year there may be 14 hour weeks, depending on the modules taken, as Drama practical modules can be 7 hours per day.

3. What are class sizes like?

First year lectures have around 250 students in them, but seminars are smaller groups of 15-20. Lecture sizes get smaller in second and third year as there are more modules available for students to choose from.

Drama: Most seminars and practical workshops range between 10-20 people.

4. How many books do you have to read a week?

English: We usually have to read one novel per module per week, occasionally alongside some theoretical extracts, making it 4-5 texts a week. Some texts are studied over two weeks so students (particularly in first year) may sometimes only need to read a novel/play every other week.

Drama: Roughly around 2-3 primary books a week, excluding secondary reading, in first and second year. In third year we have 3-5 primary books a week, as well as secondary reading.

5. Do you have field trips?

English: We have occasional field trips, depending on the module. In first year we went to the V&A as a part of Literatures in Time as well as to The Globe to see a play and for a day of workshops for our Shakespeare module. During third year, we attended The Foundling Museum for the Children’s Literature module. Most trips are subsidised by the department so we are able to attend at reduced costs. We are also encouraged to attend museums and exhibitions in our own time.

Drama: Within Drama we had a few field trips in first year to theatres and museums, but second and third year trips vary depending on the module. London Performance Now is a second year module which consists of weekly theatre/museum visits.

Assessment

1. How many assignments do you have a year?

English and Drama: Each module has about 4-5 assignments spread throughout the academic year. So in total there’s approximately 20 assignments. For English, most of them are essays, however there are also a couple of assessed presentations and class contributions. For drama it’s a mix of written and practical work.

2.Do you have exams?

English: In first year there is a final exam for Shakespeare and Literatures in Time. Other modules in all three years are generally assessed by coursework.

Drama: We have no written exams, however, we have assessed performances which can be timed assessments within a controlled environment.

3. Do you have to write a dissertation?

English:  Yes, in third year, all single honours students must undertake a dissertation, which is a 10,000 word research project on anything of our choice so long as it falls under English Literature.

Drama: Instead of a dissertation there is a practical research module. Joint honours students have the option between the English dissertation and a Drama written project.

Support

1. What resources does the department have access to?

Students in the School of English and Drama we have access to a wide amount of literature and criticism through the Mile End campus library, as well as through the University of London inter-library loan system and Senate House Library. The university is also subscribed to many journals and periodicals, giving us access to a huge amount of material. The department has 5 Drama studio spaces including rehearsal rooms, which students have 24/7 access to. Other resources for Drama include a wide range of drama and theatre professionals lecturing on the course who have influential and current experience.

2. Is there any guidance or support for assignments?

English and Drama: As well as useful workshops,  advisers/seminar leaders/lecturers have weekly drop-in hours which  are immensely helpful for advice and guidance on academic work. There are also beneficial student organisations, such as PASS (Peer Assissted Study Support), where second and third year students offer help to first year students and a Buddy Mentoring Scheme. We also have professional Literary Fellows available to review essays before students submit them. For practical work in Drama,  consistent feedback is given by seminar leaders and peers as our work is shared with each other.

3. What’s a personal advisor?

English and Drama: A personal advisor is a teaching member of staff assigned to you in order to help and assist you with any queries you may have. Whether it’s something academic or  personal they are there to support and help you!

 

 

 

Win a Pre-Release Exclusive Copy of ‘Schadenfreude’ by our very own Tiffany Watt Smith

Win an exclusive copy of Schadenfreude: The Joy of Another’s Misfortune by our very own Dr Tiffany Watt Smith. Don’t know what schadenfreude is?

Read on below the competition…

*to enter you must be a student/alumnus of closes 17/10/18 at 17:00 GMT. There will be one winner chosen at random shortly after this date.

To enter to win simply retweet this Tweet:

Or leave a comment on this Instagram post with your Schadenfreude moment:

About the book

Schadenfreude – enjoying the pain and failures of others – is an all-too-familiar feeling. It has perplexed philosophers and psychologists for centuries but, in a time of polarised politics, twitter trolls and ‘sidebars of shame’, has never been more relevant. Recent studies have shown that we smile more at a rival’s loss than at our own success. But why can it be so much fun to witness another’s distress? And what, if anything, should we do about it?

In Schadenfreude, historian of emotions Tiffany Watt Smith offers expert insight and advice. Ranging across thinkers from Nietzsche to Homer Simpson, investigating the latest scientific research, and collecting some outrageous confessions on the way – she reveals how everyone, babies, nuns, your most trusted friends, are enjoying your misfortunes. But rather than an emotional glitch, she argues, Schadenfreude can reveal profound truths about our relationships with others and our sense of who we are.

Frank, warm and laugh-out-loud funny, Schadenfreude makes the case for thinking afresh about this much-maligned emotion – and perhaps, even, embracing it.

About the author

Tiffany Watt Smith is a Research Fellow at the QMUL Centre for the History of the Emotions, and was a 2014 BBC New Generation Thinker. She has also worked as a theatre director, including stints as Associate Director at the Arcola and International Associate Director at the Royal Court. Schadenfreude is published in association with Wellcome Collection, a free museum and library that aims to challenge how we think and feel about health. Inspired by the medical objects and curiosities collected by Henry Wellcome, it connects science, medicine, life and art. Wellcome Collection exhibitions, events and books explore a diverse range of subjects, including consciousness, forensic medicine, emotions, sexology, identity and death.

 

Dr Charlotta Salmi awarded funding to investigate representations of gender-based violence

Dr Charlotta Salmi who uses street art and comics to understand social movements has been awarded funding by the British Academy to carry out research on gender-based violence in Nepal.

Dr Charlotta Salmi, from Queen Mary’s School of English and Drama, will investigate representations of gender-based violence (GBV) in graphic art forms in Kathmandu and Pokhara, Nepal.

Read the full post on the QMUL news here

Victorian Protest Parade by SED and Year 7 students

On Tuesday 25 September the streets of Whitechapel resonated with the sound of songs last heard there more than a century ago.

Year 7 students from five east London schools, including Mulberry School for Girls in Shadwell, Central Foundation School for Girls in Bow and Oaklands School in Bethnal Green are exploring how Victorian Londoners protested against their pay and working conditions. They sing Victorian protest songs, make placards expressing demands and write their own political speeches and chants. On Tuesday 25 September they took part in a parade with musicians in the streets where east Londoners protested in the Victorian period.

Watch the video of the protest

Workshop organisers Dr Vivi Lachs and Dr Nadia Valman, from Queen Mary University of London, drew on their research on the wave of strikes that spread across East London in 1889 and the culture of song and oratory that accompanied it. ‘Singing songs helped raise the morale of workers who were enduring terrible conditions in factories and workshops, and brought messages of hope that collective action could bring about change’ said Dr Lachs.

The songs were sung in Yiddish, the language spoken by the Jewish immigrant population, who made up the majority of poorly paid workers in Victorian Whitechapel. ‘We hope that this project will give students a glimpse of east London’s rich local history of protest,’ said Dr Valman.

English and Drama Newsletter – October 2018

Welcome to the October 2018 edition of our School of English and Drama newsletter.

Email us to get this sent to you every month: sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

EVENTS


Show and Tell - Low Res
Listen to Show and Tell podcast #2

This episode features Wasafiri magazine editor Susheila Nasta, Medieval broadcaster Hetta Howes, podcaster Raifa Rafiq (listen to her on BBC radio here), researcher Emma Shapiro and puppeteer Edie Edmundson.

Listen now on Soundcloud

Listen now on Spotify

 

Events

UNDERGRADUATE OPEN DAY

Open Day 2018
Undergraduate Open Day
Saturday 6 October 2018 from 10:00-16:00
QMUL – Mile End

After an exciting first outing we’re excited to welcome the following speakers for our next edition:

Tasters include:

  • Looking at Atrocity in Graphic
    Narratives
    Charlotta Salmi
  • Devising from Games Mojisola Adebayo
  • Gothic magic and science in Mary Shelley’s
    Frankenstein
    Markman Ellis
  • Writing Now: Caryl Churchill Jen Harvie


And don’t miss special performances by our very own theatre company presenting Stage 3 which is an immersive theatre show about the citizenship processes.

Register for open day

See the full taster programme


OCTOBER HIGHLIGHTS

Frankenreads

#Frankenreads x QMUL – Celebrate 200 years of Frankenstein on Halloween
Wednesday 31 October 2018, 17:00-21:00
ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre QMUL- Mile End

The School of English & Drama at QMUL mark the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” in suitably scary style on Halloween. Join us for a screening of early Frankenstein films and a fancy dress lecture, followed by some scary socialising.

Book a free ticket online


OCTOBER LISTINGS

London Modernism Seminar: Insects and Robots
Saturday 6 October, 11:00-13:00
Senate House, London

Co-organised by our very own Suzanne Hobson (English) this first outing features: Rachel Murray (Bristol), ‘Shell Sense: Modernism and the Insect Body’ Alex Goody (Oxford Brookes), ‘Modernist Machine Women: Robots, Radio and Typewriters’.

Dice FestivalOur very own Daniel Oliver (Drama) is involved in these events:
TO YOU TO YOU TO YOU: Love Letters to a (Post)Europe
Friday 5 and Saturday 6 October, 19:00
Artsadmin Toynbee Studios Theatre, London

The venue provides students with a 3×2 ticket deal and we are sharing the code with academics who might be interested in promoting the event among their students and we thought of you. (the booking code is: L0VEL3TTERS).

DICE Festival
Saturday and Sunday 7 October 2018
Camden People’s Theatre, London
Daniel Oliver (Drama) will host on the Sunday programme.

Auden
The Queen Mary Centre For Religion and Literature in English Seminar Series: “W. H. Auden—Bless what there is for being”
Wednesday 10 October 2018, 12:00
ArtsOne Room 1.31, QMUL – Mile End

W. H.Auden who had a natural talent “bordering on wizardry” was the poetic voice of the younger generation in the 1930’s. About 1940 he rediscovered the Christian faith. Richard Harries, former Bishop of Oxford, will argue that this took the form of giving Auden a relish for every aspect of life in all its details. This paper comes from Harries’ latest book “Haunted by Christ: Modern Writers and the Struggle for Faith”.

SALON
S A L O N – LONDON presents: Unknowability and Collaborative Creative/Critical Practice: Ilya Parkins and Lara Haworth
Wednesday 10 October 2018, 17:00-19:00
Tenants’ Hall in the Brunswick Centre

This presentation brings together a feminist scholar and an artist who have worked together on two projects, including a participatory art installation on unknowing. They will discuss how unknowability figures in their own work and what it enables.

Dominic Johnson
QUORUM Drama Seminar: Dominic Johnson
Wednesday 10 October 2018, 18:00
Rehearsal Room 2, ArtsOne Building, QMUL – Mile End

The work of contemporary artist Anne Bean defies categorisation, encompassing performance art, public interventions, videos, and writings, all pursued as a ‘continuum’. Dominic Johnson explores Bean’s ‘life art’ project in the 1970s and considers her efforts to blur the boundaries between art and life in the context of theoretical writings she was working through at the time.

Postgrad Research Seminar
David James: QMUL English Postgraduate Research Seminar
Thursday 11 October 2018, 18:00-20:00
ArtsOne Lecture Theatre, QMUL – Mile End

We are thrilled to welcome Professor David James (University of Birmingham) who will be talking on: The Practice of Uplift.

Follow QMPGRS on Twitter for updates

Verbatim Formula
The Verbatim Formula: Making Listening Visible
Wednesday 17 October 2018, 17:00-18:30
Senior Common Room, Queen’s Building, QMUL – Mile End
The Verbatim Formula (TVF) is an AHRC funded participatory performance-based research project based at QMUL and which partners with other universities in London. In TVF, we ask care-experienced young people and care leaver students to share their experiences of higher education.

LPRS
London-Paris Romanticism Seminar
Friday 19 October 2018, 17:30
Senate House, London

You are warmly invited to join us for the launch of the new series of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar on Friday 19 October 2018. As our guest speaker for this opening event, we are delighted to welcome Marc Porée, Professor of English Literature at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. A renowned scholar, critic and translator, Marc is also Paris Director of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar. His talk, entitled A Grammar of Surprise, will be followed by a discussion and wine reception, to which all are invited.

Marx In Bloomsbury
Sunday 21 October 2018, 14:00-15:30
Senate House, London

This walking tour, led by author of Bloomsbury: Beyond the Establishment (2017), Matthew Ingleby (English), explores Bloomsbury’s links with Marx himself, in this his 200th anniversary year, but also the neighbourhood’s wider relationship to Marxism and socialism more broadly, exploring Bloomsbury’s significance for figures such as the arts and crafts revolutionary William Morris, the socialist feminist Isabella Ford, and the Trinidadian historian C. L. R. James.


PLUS IN EARLY NOVEMBER

New Suns
New Suns: A Feminist Literary Festival at the Barbican
Sunday 4 November 2018
Barbican, London

Inspired by African -American author Octavia Butler’s epigraph New Suns: A Feminist Literary Festival is a day of talks, workshops, screenings and feminist discussion at the Barbican features our very own Nisha Ramayya (English).

Writers, artists, academics, poets and publications will explore contemporary feminism through the lens of mythology, discussing topics as varied as the #MeToo movement, occult poetry, bodies and sex work.


News from the School

Charlotta Salmi
Charlotta Salmi (English) has been awarded funding by the British Academy to carry out research on gender-based violence in Nepal. Charlotta uses street art and comics to understand social movements. Read more

Scents and Sensibility / Duff
Catherine Maxwell (English)’s monograph Scents and Sensibility: Perfume in Victorian Literary Culture (Oxford University Press, 2017) has won the 2018 ESSE (European Society for the Study of English) prize for the best book published in the period 2016-17 in the category ‘Literatures in the English Language’ .

Book Published this Month


Susheila Nasta (English) will annoucnce SI Leeds prize with Bidisha at the Ilkley Festival on the 3rd October and also doing an event there on Writing post-Windrush with Bidisha and Jeremy Poynting.

Wasafiri magazine (based at QMUL) are announcing the winners of the Wasafiri New Writing Prize at Marlborough House on the 25th October. All staff invited and the news is that QM will be funding it from 2019 which is Wasafiri’s 35th Birthday year and the 10th year of the prize. Attend the event
 


Links

Postcolonial Seminar
Queen Mary Postcolonial Seminar is starting up again with the following events in September:Work-in-progress Seminar
‘Dinkar’s China Writings: The 1957 Chinese Literary Sphere in Hindi’*
Adhira Mangalagiri, QMUL
4 October, 18:00, ArtsTwo 2.17
*please email a.mangalagiri@qmul.ac.uk for a copy of the paper

Public Lecture
‘Reading for the Planet: Environmental Crisis and World Literature’

Jennifer Wenzel, Columbia University
30 October, 18:00, ArtsOne Lecture Theatre

Subscribe to the mailing list here

Being Human
Our contributions to Being Human Festival including The Last of The London (Nadia Valman – English) are now live for booking. Read our blog post for details

Jobs, Events & Opportunities from SED’s Careers Consultant Caroline Lisser – Thursday 4 October 2018

  • Teaching
  • SED Careers Appointments
  • Careers in Market Research
  • QMUL Graduate Scheme
  • QM Career Mentoring
  • The Business & Finance Fair
  • Part-time/Temporary roles as QM Annual Fund Caller
  • Alumni tips on work experience

Teaching: the Government has announced the bursary levels for trainee teachers for 2019.  The English bursary is £15,000… read more here: https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/funding-my-teacher-training/bursaries-and-scholarships-for-teacher-training


SED exclusive appointments for career discussions with Caroline, are available on Thursday 11th October afternoon. 

To book, phone 020 7882 8533 or drop-in to the Careers Centre in Queens Building.


Exploring Careers in Market Research: 15th October – 6pm

A fantastic panel of researchers has been signed up for this event including the Head of Research for BBC Media Action… come and discover a whole world of careers that you did not know existed and learn more about how research shapes so many business decisions.  English students have a fantastic skillset, particularly for qualitative market research… come and find out more.  Details and booking here: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=4981&service=Careers+Service


QMUL Graduate Scheme:

Attention 3rd years:  have you become rather attached to QMUL and wondering what you will do after your degree?  Join the leadership graduate scheme at Queen Mary… applications are open now for jobs starting in September 2019.  This scheme is a leadership programme for graduates wanting to work in Higher Education. You will receive high-quality training and one year’s membership of the Association of University Administrators, whilst undertaking two 6 month placements at Queen Mary and one 6 month placement at another UK university. The scheme runs from September 2019-February 2021 and you will earn £22-28K. Find out more about this scheme on 18th October at the ‘Careers in the Community – working in the public sector’ event.

Apply at https://www.ambitiousfutures.co.uk  Closing Date for Applications: January 2019


Business employers on campus:

For those of you wanting to explore a career in Business… The annual QM Business & Finance Fair is next week on 8th October… Come along and talk to employers about why they are interested in English students/graduates  and what kind of jobs exist in their organisations.
Places limited, so reserve here: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=4569&service=Careers+Service 


DON’T FORGET TO APPLY FOR QMENTORING – DEADLINE 5PM, OCTOBER 8TH.

Interested in gaining 6 months of one-to-one support from an experienced professional?  In receipt of the QMUL Bursary?

Particularly if you are in your 3rd year, this is a not to be missed opportunity to have a professional working in a field that interests you, to guide you through the career decision making and job search process.

To apply for a place, please go to: qmul.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/qmentoring-application.

For general enquiries, please email qmentoring@qmul.ac.uk, or call the team on 020 7882 3690.

https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=5231&service=Careers+Service


QMUL Annual Fund Caller – part-time role, apply NOW! 

https://www.qmul.ac.uk/alumni/supportingqm/aftc/apply-to-be-a-caller/

We’re looking for 40 student callers to work on our telephone campaign in November. Deadline: Wednesday 10 October.

You will: be paid £10.43 per hour (plus holiday pay); gain invaluable careers advice from alumni; be expected to attend 3-4 shifts (one weekend); receive full paid training on Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 October


School of Languages & Linguistics have an alumni work experience event to which you are invited… useful if you want to hear about how to get experience in order to  build a career in communications, charities or freelance writing. Tuesday 9th October, 5.30pm

Work experience is one of the most efficient ways to test out career ideas.
But how do you get it? What should you look for in a placement?
In this alumni panel you’ll hear the honest stories of three recent alumni (both extroverted and introverted) who did a variety of different things to get work experience.

Charlotte Stockton (French & Eng.Lit) – while at QMUL Charlotte did three different internships in marketing and promotions, including one over 8 months at City Hall for the Mayor of London. She now works in business development for a communications agency in London.

Laura Potter (Comp.Lit & Linguistics) – Laura left QMUL in 2017 and during her degree she got work experience as a News Desk Assistant at the Guardian, worked as features and music editor and a freelance reporter for a variety of on and off-campus publications. She is passionate about mental wellbeing and was the QMSU welfare rep. She now works as Communications Executive at charity Dementia UK.

Aisha Rimi (French & German) – During her time at uni Aisha worked as a fashion production assistant, doing communications for a local charity via QProjects Summer, a telephone fundraiser, a social media intern for a start-up, sub-editor on a student newspaper, shop assistant and more. She’s now works as a freelance writer and as the Volunteer Centre Coordinator at London School of Economics.

Book a place here: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=5231&service=Careers+Service

Listen to our Show and Tell #2 Podcast featuring Susheila Nasta (Wasafiri), Raifa Rafiq (Mostly Lit), Hetta Howes (City), Emma Shapiro (Pembroke College Library) and Edie Edmundson (Puppeteer)

Show and Tell is a series of TED-talk style events where speakers from the arts, humanities and creative industries tell their stories at Queen Mary University of London. Find out more: bit.ly/showandtell18

This episode features Wasafiri magazine editor Susheila Nasta, Medieval broadcaster Hetta Howes, podcaster Raifa Rafiq, researcher Emma Shapiro and puppeteer Edie Edmundson. Full biogs below.

The show is introduced by Beverley Stewart and hosted by Charlie Pullen from the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary.

Subscribe on Spotify

Charlie Pullen
Charlie Pullen is a PhD candidate and Teaching Associate in English at Queen Mary University of London, where he researches education in the work of various early twentieth-century novelists, including H.G. Wells, D.H. Lawrence, and Dorothy Richardson. His background is in widening participation and outreach and he writes for Times Higher Education.

Susheila Nasta
Professor Susheila Nasta, Prof of Modern and Contemporary Literature at QMUL, Emerita at Open University is a renowned critic, broadcaster and literary activist. Editor-in-chief at Wasafiri, the magazine of international contemporary writing, which she founded in 1984, she has published widely on South Asian Britain.
www.wasafiri.org

Hetta Howes
Dr Hetta Howes is a lecturer in Medieval Literature at City, University of London. Her research specialises in women’s devotion in the Middle Ages, and as a BBC/AHRC New Generation Thinker she is committed to sharing that research with a wider audience.

Raifa Rafiq
Raifa Rafiq is a trainee solicitor at one of the leading international law firms in the UK. She is also creator and co-host of the Literature and popular culture podcast Mostly Lit – named by the Guardian and the BBC as one of the top podcasts of 2017.
mostly-lit.com

Emma Shapiro
After graduating with a BA in English and French from Queen Mary, Emma Shapiro was awarded a scholarship to complete an MA in London Studies, where she specialised in the Trinidadian writer Sam Selvon’s London fiction. Following her studies, Emma worked as a voluntary researcher for the Migration Museum project and as the graduate trainee at Pembroke College Library, Cambridge, where she curated an exhibition on the poet and co-founder of the Caribbean Artists Movement, Kamau Brathwaite, working in collaboration with the George Padmore Institute.

Edie Edmundson
Edie is a puppeteer and theatre maker who graduated from Drama at QM in 2015 and went on to train at the Curious School of Puppetry. Since then she has worked with Emma Rice at Shakespeare’s Globe, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Puppet Theatre Barge. She also writes and directs her own work, and is co-founder and associate director of Wondering Hands Theatre. She is currently puppeteering in ‘The Butterfly’s Spell’ at the Puppet Theatre Barge and is puppetry director for ‘The Comedy of Errors’ at the RSC.