2016 Masters Opportunities at SED

Our MA programmes can provide a breath of fresh air, empowering you with advanced subject knowledge and experience within the realms of English and Drama.

Register your interest

 

New for 2016

 

MA Poetry

With artists like Kate Tempest and Benjamin Clementine breaking into the mainstream, poetry really is the new rock and roll. Our MA in Poetry provides a chance to specialise in historical and contemporary poetry while studying in London, the heart of the nation’s creative industries.

See the full programme description

 

MSc in Creative Arts and Mental Health

A unique opportunity to study applied theatre and it’s connections with mental health.

Download our PDF for more information

 

The Classics

 

MA English Studies

With 7 different pathways our MA in English Studies is a great way to get closer to the literature and theory you love. Our team has a huge range of research expertise. We recommend having a trawl around our staff pages to see who might be right to support your study.

MAEnglishStudies7Pathways

MA Theatre and Performance

Our MA in Theatre and Performance is well-renowned for groundbreaking practical research, take a look at our pages here for more information about the cutting-edge programme.

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Ask a question about our Masters programmes

Queen Mary at the Edinburgh Festivals

The Edinburgh Festivals are stuffed full of talented students, graduates and staff from Queen Mary. If you’re at the fringe please do support these performers and staff.

Queen Mary Theatre Company

qmtc fringe

Queen Mary Theatre Company is made up of students from across Queen Mary including from our Drama and English programmes. This year they’re presenting four shows:

  1. Crapappella (Aug 16, 18, 20, 23, 25, 27): Featuring timeless classics such as Diarrhoea, The Comic Sans Song, and Ballad to Beige, Crapappella isn’t any ordinary a cappella show…
  2. iDolls (Aug 16, 18, 20, 23, 25, 27): Can’t imagine a world without social media? Welcome to a world within social media.
  3. Monkhouse (Aug 15, 17, 19, 22, 24, 26): Welcome to the world’s worst school disco. The Monkhouse School Annual Ball goes horribly wrong as an unknown shooter fires two shots into the dark 1960s London night.
  4. Rotterz (Aug 15, 17, 19, 22, 24, 26 ): Four youngsters and their dog battle an unexpected apocalypse on a small Scottish island.

 

Alumni at The Fringe

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Our alumni are out in force to represent the best of theatre and performance practice and critique. Here’s a selection:

  1. Billy Barrett: Fringe reviewer and member of company Breach showing the much talked about and now (19/08/2016) Fringe First award-winning Tank.
  2. Figs in Wigs: Quirky pop-theatre sensation Figs in Wigs are a favourite of Lyn Gardner the Guardian’s theatre supremo and their show is already getting rave reviews.
  3. Victoria Hancock: is performing her Tom Waits inspired solo show Frontal Lobotomy at Southside Social!
  4. Dr Brian Lobel: MA and PhD grad is leading The Sick of the Fringe programme.
  5. Catherine Love: Reviewer extraodinaire, read Catherine’s articulate insight into the world of contemporary performance.
  6. Elf Lyons: Comedienne and provocateur Elf explores ‘the age-old fear of turning into your mother and what it means to have it all…’.
  7. Simon Nader: Simon is at Assembly Roxy with a ‘sell out B-movie show (deep breath) Escape From the Planet of the Day That Time Forgot.
  8. Sh*t Theatre: One of the Guardian’s picks of the day, Letters to Windsor House is an eye-opening look into east London life through the opening of other people’s mail is a must-see.
  9. Xavier de Souza: Prolific producer Xavier is chairing an event for producers as part of innovative health-based programme The Sick of the Fringe.
  10. Karl Taylor: Producer extraordinaire of the talk of the fringe, Triple Threat by Lucy McCormick at Underbelly Cowgate.

 

Staff at the Edinburgh Festivals

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Our staff across the School are busy performing or presenting their research to a wider audience of festival goers:

  1. Jerry Brotton (Aug 27): We admit this event isn’t at the Edinburgh festivals but it’s in AUgust a lovely event so we thought we’d include. Jerry Brotton looks at maps and how they can embody cultural values at Beyond Borders International Festival of Literature & Thought.
  2. Daniel Oliver (Aug 11-14): Daniel brings his ‘calamitous participatory performances’, Weird Seances to the Forest Fringe.
  3. Tiffany Watt Smith (Aug 18): Dissects the history and meaning of a cornucopia of emotions at the Edinburgh Book Festival.

 

Did we forget anyone? Please let us know and we’ll make sure we add into this post.

English Professor Isabel Rivers elected a fellow of the prestigious Ecclesiastical History Society

Isabel Rivers, Professor of Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Culture in the School of English and Drama, has been elected a Fellow of the Ecclesiastical History Society.

The Society’s aims are to foster interest in, and to advance the study of, all areas of the history of the Christian Churches. The number of Fellows is strictly limited to twenty-five of the world’s leading experts in the field. Professor Rivers has been recognised by the Society for her energetic commitment to eighteenth-century religious history throughout her career.

Professor Rivers has worked at Queen Mary for 12 years and recently helped to establish The Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literature in English.

She said:

‘It is a great honour to have been elected a member of the Society, alongside world-famous theologians and religious historians including Peter Brown (Princeton), Diarmaid MacCulloch (Oxford), and Rowan Williams (Cambridge). My research is interdisciplinary, and focuses on literature and religion, intellectual and religious history, and the history of the book in the long eighteenth century.’

Find out more about Isabel’s research

SED’s Reaction to National Student Survey 2016: The university experience is so much more than statistics

The NSS results are in, and they are very good for English and Drama at Queen Mary. In Drama we scored 96% overall satisfaction, and in English 91% for the same, both up from last year.

But what does all this mean for you?

For the stattos out there, that places Drama in the top 10 nationally, 2nd in the Russell Group, and 3rd in London. English is 2nd in the Russell Group in London. Both departments also did really well on the question asking students how satisfied they are with teaching: 98% in Drama and 94% in English.

We are very grateful to all the third year students who filled in the National Student Survey. We take the survey seriously (especially when we do well!), but statistics don’t tell the whole story. There’s so much more to a degree in English or Drama —or one of our joint programmes. Our highest priority is students, their education, and their experience on the degree.

Students need high quality, cutting edge teaching delivered by top researchers in the discipline. But they also need to feel safe, cared for, and supported. They need a space where they can learn about our subjects, and also grow as people, so that they become critical and engaged citizens prepared for the wider world. University is about so much more than what can be measured in the statistics of a survey.

George Oliver Readshaw from QMTC on Monkhouse at the Edinburgh Fringe

Monkhouse is one of four shows on its way to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe with the Queen Mary Theatre Company.

We caught up with George Oliver Readshaw to talk about creating the show and the build up to the festival thus far…

If you’re not up at the fringe be sure to reserve a ticket for the preview happening on Friday 5 August at 7pm.


Tell us about Monkhouse the show you’re taking up to the Edinburgh Fringe for 2016? What will an audience experience?

Monkhouse is a one-room-whodunnit-thriller-black-comedy-1960s-period-piece-theatrical-slap-in-the-face. It follows six horrible cockney kids hiding from an unknown gunman in their school gym.

While writing the script and compiling ideas it was incredibly important to me that this was a one hour show squeezed into 45 minutes. Our slot at the Edinburgh Fringe is exactly one hour, and they are very strict, so that includes getting the audience (hopefully in their thousands) seated, getting all the props and set ready after the previous show, and then vice versa. So really we have 45 minutes tops to get a show done. That’s not very long. So it’s vital that the audience can laugh, cry and generally live every moment as much as they can and as quickly as they can. So an audience can expect a super-charged, high tempo assault on their senses. That said, I’m a big fan of the theatrical ‘pause’, so we’ve made time for a few of those too.

 

What’s been the biggest thing you’ve learned so far in preparing for the Edinburgh fringe?

Research. DO YOUR RESEARCH. Be it promotional material, costume design, voice, lexicon, where one wears one’s trousers, the past is a different country and details are vital. We’ve played fast and loose with a couple of things, but we are really trying to create an authentic 1960s London aesthetic. The world of the play has to be compelling and true as well as sexy and cool, and the research side, as tedious as it can be, is so so important to any piece.

 

How do you think being in the QMTC helps your future career?

Immeasurably. I’m lucky enough to be continuing my studies at drama school this September and I know I would never be anywhere near that were it not for the opportunities offered by QMTC. Our university has a deservedly well renowned reputation for its drama department, and the plethora of performance styles that you are exposed to here is just phenomenal. I’ve seen my friends doing all sorts on stage, and the talent that lies here at QM is pretty inspiring. I’ve been involved in plays by Terrence Rattigan, Edward Albee, Sondheim, Shakespeare and most importantly some supremely talented writers and directors who are students just like me. This is kind of what it’s about really. Making plays with your mates. I would say that QMTC has put me exactly where I want to be.

 

Tell us about your time at Queen Mary and how you came to study with us. What have been your highlights so far studying drama at Queen Mary?

Well I am actually an English student but in honesty have spent the vast majority of my university life in the Pinter Studio. Basically all of it. I should pay rent there. But my highlights have been my experiences at the Edinburgh Fringe. I’ve been lucky enough to be involved in two really interesting and funny fringe shows, both with fantastic people, all of whom are big friends of mine still. It’s such a great thing that QM offers, you get to take something that you have made and show it to the wider world at the biggest arts festival on the planet. Plus it’s the biggest party on the planet.

 

Find out how to book tickets for the Monkhouse London preview

Find out more about the Queen Mary Theatre Company